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Honey Bees in North America * Pollen collection by Honey Bees * Bee Pollen & Dosage

Learn About Honey * Queen Bee Development * Why Does Raw Honey Crystallize

What's Considered Good Quality Honey * What is Royal Jelly * What is Creamed Honey & How to Make It

How to Harvest Your Beehive * What is Organic Honey * Honey & Milk for Good Health

9 Easy Face Masks Recipes * What is a swarm

Apple Cider Vinegar and Honey * Honey & Diabetic Diet *

Honey and Weight Loss * Honey Remedies for Ailments 

What Is Royal Jelly Really * An effective cough remedy * Honey and Ginger

Honey Storage Tips * Royal Jelly



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3 Key Differences: Honey Vs Sugar

 

Both sweeteners contain glucose and fructose. However, for sugar, in the process of manufacturing, the organic acids, protein, nitrogen elements, enzymes and vitamins in the sugar cane are destroyed, whereas honey, a natural sweetener, subjects only to minimal heating. Also, honey has certain beneficial antioxidant and antimicrobial properties which are not present in table sugar.

Here are three key points of comparison between honey and table sugar that will make you feel good about eating honey:

 

1. Lesser Amount is Required of Honey

One tablespoon of table sugar or sucrose contains 46 calories, while one tablespoon of natural sweetener honey has 64 calories. Though honey may have more calories, we actually need to use less of it since it is sweeter than table sugar. As a result, you may in fact consume even less amount of calories that you would with sugar. And in the long run even though honey is more expensive, it may be more economical than table sugar. I was taken aback when I first found out how much table sugar I was consuming when I take a can of coke -- 10 teaspoons, and a 50g chocolate bar -- 7 teaspoons! (Food Calorie)

 

2. Honey is Slowly Absorbed into Bloodstream

Table sugar is sucrose, which is made up of two molecules bonded together. When we eat table sugar, our stomach has to use its own enzymes to separate the molecules apart before we can use the sugar's energy. Honey is quite different. The bees have added a special enzyme to the nectar that divides the sucrose into glucose and fructose -- two simple sugars for our bodies can absorb directly.

Hence, honey vs sugar, honey has a healthier Glycemic Index (GI) which measures the negative impact of a given food on the blood-glucose level. The lower the GI rating, the slower the absorption and infusion of sugars into the bloodstream and hence a more gradual and healthier digestion process (The Glycemic Index).

"The rapidity with which sucrose (table sugar) raises blood glucose levels can cause problems for people suffering from defects in glucose metabolism... When foods containing a high percentage of sucrose are consumed, many beneficial and required nutrients may be displaced from the diet, thus contributing to increased risks for several chronic diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, some forms of cancers, osteoporosis and even neuron-degenerative diseases."

~ The Honey Revolution, Dr Ron Fessenden

 

3. Honey has Nutrients

Unlike honey, table sugar lacks minerals and vitamins (hence it's been often called empty calories), they draw upon the body's nutrients to be metabolized into the system. When these nutrients are all used up, metabolizing of undesirable cholesterol and fatty acid is impeded, contributing to higher cholesterol and promoting obesity due to higher fatty acid on the organs and tissues. That is why it is not uncommon for fat people to suffer from malnutrition and many other health related problems. So the message is, honey vs sugar, if you are watching your weight, honey will be a smarter choice than sugar. Besides the differences in nutrition, I feel sugar can never compete with honey in taste. Though both are sweet, honey has such a unique flavor that can be very useful and superior in many foods and beverages. The range of honey floral varieties is so vast that experiencing for yourself the uniqueness of each variety and being able to appropriate each variety to exploit every possibility to complement and improve taste of different types of foods becomes a skillful art.

 

Reprinted in part.

 

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What's killing Our Bees?

 

 

Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) is the phenomenon that occurs when the majority of worker bees in a colony disappear and leave behind a queen, plenty of food and a few nurse bees to care for the remaining immature bees and the queen. While such disappearances have occurred throughout the history of apiculture, and were known by various names (disappearing disease, spring dwindle, May disease, autumn collapse, and fall dwindle disease),[1] the syndrome was renamed colony collapse disorder in late 2006[2] in conjunction with a drastic rise in the number of disappearances of western honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies in North America.[3] European beekeepers observed similar phenomena in Belgium, France, the Netherlands, Greece, Italy, Portugal, and Spain,[4] Switzerland and Germany, albeit to a lesser degree,[5] and the Northern Ireland Assembly received reports of a decline greater than 50%.[6]

Colony collapse disorder causes significant economic losses because many agricultural crops (although no staple foods) worldwide are pollinated by western honey bees. According to the Agriculture and Consumer Protection Department of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the worth of global crops with honey bee pollination was estimated at close to $200 billion in 2005.[7] Shortages of bees in the US have increased the cost to farmers renting them for pollination services by up to 20%.[8]

In the six years leading up to 2013, more than 10 million beehives were lost, often to CCD,[9] nearly twice the normal rate of loss. To put this in perspective, according to U.N. FAO data, the world's beehive stock rose from around 50 million in 1961 to around 83 million in 2014, which is about 1.3% average annual growth. Average annual growth has accelerated to 1.9% since 2009.

Several possible causes for CCD have been proposed, but no single proposal has gained widespread acceptance among the scientific community. Suggested causes include: infections with Varroa and Acarapis mites; malnutrition; various pathogens; genetic factors; immune deficiencies; loss of habitat; changing beekeeping practices; or a combination of factors.[10] A large amount of speculation has surrounded a family of pesticides called neonicotinoids as having caused CCD

 

Reprinted in part. The Complete story can be found at: Full Story

 

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The Top 6 Raw Honey Benefits

1. A Good Source of Antioxidants

Raw honey contains antioxidants called phenolic compounds. Some types of honey have as many antioxidants as fruits and vegetables. Antioxidants help to protect your body from cell damage due to free radicals.

Free radicals contribute to the aging process and may also contribute to the development of chronic diseases such as cancer and heart disease. Studies show that polyphenols in honey may play a role in preventing heart disease.

2. Antibacterial and Antifungal Properties

Raw honey can kill unwanted bacteria and fungus. It naturally contains hydrogen peroxide, an antiseptic. Several hospitals in Europe have used Manuka honey to fight methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a type of staph bacterial infection that’s become resistant to antibiotics. The effectiveness of honey as an antibacterial or antifungal depends on the type of honey.

The exact ingredients of honey depend on which plants bees get their nectar from.

3. Heal Wounds

Manuka honey is also used in medical settings to treat wounds because it’s an effective germ killer. Researchers believe this is because it has additional antibacterial properties besides the natural hydrogen peroxide.

Studies show that Manuka honey can boost healing time and reduce infections in wounds. However, the honey used in hospital settings is medical grade, meaning it’s safe and sterile. You shouldn’t expect to treat injuries with the honey you buy from a grocery store.

4. Filled with Phytonutrients

Phytonutrients are compounds found in plants that help protect the plant from harm. For example, some may keep insects away or shield the plant from harsh UV radiation.

Phytonutrients provide both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, which help you maintain good health. Because honey is made from plants, it also has phytonutrients. These valuable nutrients are unique to raw honey and disappear when honey is heavily processed.

5. Help for Digestive Issues

Honey is sometimes used to treat digestive issues such as diarrhea, though there isn’t much research to show that it works. However, it’s proven to be effective as a treatment for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a common cause of peptic ulcers. (Peptic ulcers occur in the stomach or digestive system.) Taking 1-2 teaspoons on an empty stomach is said to soothe pain and help with the healing process.

6. Soothe a Sore Throat

Have a cold? Try a spoonful of honey. Honey is an old sore throat remedy. Try adding it to hot tea with lemon. It also works as a cough suppressant.

Research shows that honey is as effective as dextromethorphan, a common over-the-counter cough medicine ingredient, in treating a cough. Just eat one or two teaspoons straight.

 

Reprinted in part. The Complete story can be found at: Full Story

 

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Royal jelly

 

 

 
 


Royal jelly is a honey bee secretion that is used in the nutrition of larvae, as well as adult queens.[1] It is secreted from the glands in the hypopharynx of nurse bees, and fed to all larvae in the colony, regardless of sex or caste

When worker bees decide to make a new queen, because the old one is either weakening or dead, they choose several small larvae and feed them with copious amounts of royal jelly in specially constructed queen cells. This type of feeding triggers the development of queen morphology, including the fully developed ovaries needed to lay eggs.

Royal jelly has long been sold as both a dietary supplement and alternative medicine. Both the European Food Safety Authority and United States Food and Drug Administration have concluded that the current evidence does not support the claim of health benefits, and have actively discouraged the sale and consumption of the jelly. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration has taken legal action against companies that have used unfounded claims of health benefits to market royal jelly products. There have also been documented cases of allergic reactions, namely hives, asthma, and anaphylaxis, due to consumption of royal jelly.

 

Cultivation

Royal jelly is secreted from the glands in the heads of worker bees and is fed to all bee larvae, whether they are destined to become drones (males), workers (sterile females), or queens (fertile females). After three days, the drone and worker larvae are no longer fed with royal jelly, but queen larvae continue to be fed this special substance throughout their development.

It is harvested by humans by stimulating colonies with movable frame hives to produce queen bees. Royal jelly is collected from each individual queen cell (honeycomb) when the queen larvae are about four days old. It is collected from queen cells because these are the only cells in which large amounts are deposited; when royal jelly is fed to worker larvae, it is fed directly to them, and they consume it as it is produced, while the cells of queen larvae are "stocked" with royal jelly much faster than the larvae can consume it. Therefore, only in queen cells is the harvest of royal jelly practical. A well-managed hive during a season of 5–6 months can produce approximately 500 g of royal jelly. Since the product is perishable, producers must have immediate access to proper cold storage (e.g., a household refrigerator or freezer) in which the royal jelly is stored until it is sold or conveyed to a collection center. Sometimes honey or beeswax is added to the royal jelly, which is thought to aid its preservation.

 

Reprinted in part. The Complete story can be found at: Full Story

 

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5 Best Honey Storage Tips

 

1. Honey that Granulates Over Time Can be Restored

While one of the greatest facts on honey storage is that it doesn't spoil even with no preservatives and additives, liquid honey is susceptible to physical and chemical changes over time; it can darken and lose some of its aroma and flavor when there is no proper storage. For commercial reasons, a certain shelf life is often stated on the honey bottles in the shop.

 

honey storage tips image Over time, liquid honey also tends to naturally crystallize - a process where the honey appears to be thickened, become lumpy and grainy (see the image below). The rate of crystallization varies for the different types of honey. Tupelo honey and Acacia honey, for instance, tend to stay liquid and can resist crystallization better than other types of honey, whereas Dandelion, Clover and Lavender honey rush to crystallize.

 

Crystallization is easily reversible and does not affect the taste and quality of the honey at all, although it adversely changes its appearance. So, please don't throw away sugary-looking honey, it hasn't gone bad! It's easy to restore granulated honey to its natural state, for instance you could put grainy honey on hot toast, the granules will melt as you eat. You can also place a granulated jar over hot water (about 40-degree C), as soon as the granules are dissolved, remove the honey from the heat and let it cool as quickly as possible. Remember, avoid adding boiling hot water to honey! Honey that has been processed and heated will remain liquid for a few months. For this reason, some manufacturers do pasteurization whereby the honey is heated very quickly and then rapidly cooled to slow down the granulation process of the honey (especially for certain floral varietals) so that they will last longer in its liquid state (and look desirable) on the shelves.

 

 

2. Ideal Storage Temperature

We often read from honey storage tips that honey can be kept at room temperature and should not be stored in too cold nor too hot place. The problem here is it can be confusing because room temperature varies from country to country! For instance, where I live, room temperature sometimes could be as high as 35-degree C but I usually do not refrigerate my honey as cold temperatures hardens it and makes scooping and mixing it with other foods and beverages difficult, and it also speeds up the process of granulation.

 

3. Avoid Moisture Absorption

Honey should be stored in a cool dry place, making sure that the container cap is on tight since honey tends to absorb moisture from the environment, which can cause fermentation and lower its quality. Always scoop honey from jars using a dry spoon as any introduction of water content into the jars should be avoided.

 

4. Store Honey Away From Heat Sources

Store honey away from direct heat (eg near stove area, hot kitchen appliances) or sunlight (next to the windows) as excessive heat over time can affect honey properties. And this is the reason why some honey comes in dark containers. However, these dark containers do not allow consumers to judge the color, viscosity, and crystallization of the honey. While glass packaging is preferred by some people as glass is relatively neutral and doesn't react with food and cause any chemical transfer, storing honey in food grade plastic containers should not pose any safety or health concern as well.

 

5. When to Refrigerate Honey

For honey which possesses a naturally high moisture content, yeast may reproduce over time without proper storage, causing fermentation. While fermentation does not necessarily pose any health risk (mead by the way is fermented honey), some manufacturers pasteurize their honey to kill any yeast cell. For honey that is very runny and requires long term storage, I would advise leaving it in the fridge to prevent any possible fermentation and change of taste.

 

 

Reprinted in part. The Complete story can be found at: Full Story

 

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Honey Ginger Remedy

 

 

 

What is this?

Honey ginger is an ancient tonic particularly popular in Asian, Indian, and Arabic herbal traditions and cultures whereby honey water is used as a medium for transmitting the benefits of the ginger root to the body. Read below for its many medicinal benefits without all the side-effects of synthetic medicines.

 

All you would need are:
 

1 tablespoon of freshly grated/finely chopped ginger
1 tablespoon honey
1 cup of hot water/tea

 

Ready to go in just a few simple steps:
 

1. Prepare the grated ginger in a cup and pour hot boiling water/tea.
2. Let it steep for 5-10 minutes and remove the ginger with a strainer.
3. Add honey when the drink has cooled down to some extent.

 

 

Many Health Benefits:

The honey and ginger tonic is best known as a remedy for digestive issues. Like a natural herbal antibiotic, the spicy mixture, with its broad-spectrum of inherent antibacterial, antiviral and anti-parasitic properties, volatile oils and phenol compounds, is touted for the following medicinal benefits:

1. Stimulates the body immunity of those with a weak digestion system.
2. Fights toxins, aids in moving food through the stomach and digestive tract.
3. Treats stomach upset, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.
4. Relieve bloating sensation and colic conditions.

As the ginger root is a superb source of antioxidants such as gingerols, zingerones and shogaols, a warm honey ginger drink is also a popular cold regiment for many people who are dealing with common cold and flu symptoms. With a squeeze of fresh lemon juice added, this tangy drink effectively:
1. Soothes scratchy throat.
2. Acts as an excellent expectorant for cough.
3. Helps clear sinuses.
4. Provides good relief from headache, and runny nose.

Other frequently cited benefits of this old school concoction are associated with its effectiveness as a natural pain killer. They are:
1. Reducing inflammation, it alleviates swelling and pain in arthritis case.
2. Alleviating pains from migraines.
3. Relieving discomfort from menstrual cramps.

 

Reprinted in part. The Complete story can be found at: Full Story

 

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From: Mayo Clinic Newsletter

 

Honey: An effective cough remedy?


Is it true that honey calms coughs better than
cough medicine?

 

Drinking tea or warm lemon water mixed with honey is a time-honored way to soothe a sore throat. But honey alone may be an effective cough suppressant, too.

 

In one study, children age 2 and older with upper respiratory tract infections were given up to 2 teaspoons (10 milliliters) of honey at bedtime. The honey seemed to reduce nighttime coughing and improve sleep.

 

In fact, in the study, honey appeared to be as effective as a common cough suppressant ingredient, dextromethorphan, in typical over-the-counter doses. Since honey is low-cost and widely available, it might be worth a try.

However, due to the risk of infant botulism, a rare but serious form of food poisoning, never give honey to a child younger than age 1.

And remember: Coughing isn't all bad. It helps clear mucus from your airway. If you or your child is otherwise healthy, there's usually no reason to suppress a cough.

 

Reprinted in part. The Complete story can be found at: Full Story

 

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and also this week. . .

 

What Is Royal Jelly Really?

 

In Answer to the numerous Questions, This Week, About Royal Jelly, Here is What We Have Found.

 

Royal jelly is a honey bee secretion that is used in the nutrition of larvae, as well as adult queens. It is secreted from the glands in the hypopharynx of worker bees, and fed to all larvae in the colony, regardless of sex or caste.

When worker bees decide to make a new queen, because the old one is either weakening or dead, they choose several small larvae and feed them with copious amounts of royal jelly in specially constructed queen cells. This type of feeding triggers the development of queen morphology, including the fully developed ovaries needed to lay eggs.

Royal jelly has long been sold as both a dietary supplement and alternative medicine. Both the European Food Safety Authority and United States Food and Drug Administration have concluded that the current evidence does not support the claim of health benefits, and have actively discouraged the sale and consumption of the jelly. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration has taken legal action against companies that have used unfounded claims of health benefits to market royal jelly products. There have also been documented cases of allergic reactions, namely hives, asthma, and anaphylaxis, due to consumption of royal jelly.

 

 

Reprinted in part. The Complete story can be found at: Full Story

 

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Ginger & Charles
 

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Four

Honey Remedies for Ailments

 

FOR CUTS AND BURNS:

For thousands of years, honey has been recognized as one of the most natural home remedies to treat a wide range of ailments and complaints including yeast infection, athlete foot, and arthritis pain. Its antiseptic properties inhibits the growth of certain bacteria and helps keep external wounds clean and free from infection. Honey has been used as a natural cure in first aid treatment for wounds, burns and cuts as it is able to absorb moisture from the air and promote healing. Its antibacterial properties prevent infection and functions as an anti-inflammatory agent, reducing both swelling and pain, and even scarring.

 

FOR HANGOVERS:

When you get a hangover from drinking too much alcohol, combat its effects by applying honey remedy. Honey is gentle on the stomach and contains a mix of natural sugars such fructose which is known to speed up the oxidation of alcohol by the liver, acting as a 'sobering' agent. Follow this recipe: 15ml of liquid honey with 80ml of orange juice and 70ml of natural yogurt. Blend them together until smooth.

 

FOR SORE THROATS:

One of the better-known health benefits of honey is that it is able to help treat sore throats. Thanks to its antimicrobial properties, honey not only soothes throats but can also kill certain bacteria that causes the infection. Professional singers commonly use honey to soothe their throats before performances. The Chinese believe that excess "heartiness" in the body causes sore throat and taking honey drink can be helpful. Direction: Take a spoonful of honey to soothe the inflammation or gargle with a mixture of two tablespoons of honey, four tablespoons of lemon juice and a pinch of salt. Personally, whenever I have a sore throat or cough, I especially like to take warm water mixed with Manuka UMF honey which is well-known for its anti-bacterial healing properties.

 

For SLEEPLESSNESS:

Unable to sleep? Use the famous Milk and Honey Remedy. Take a glass of hot milk with a teaspoon of honey to calm the soul and induce sleep. Or, add 1 or 2 teaspoons of honey to a cup of chamomile tea and sip.

 

Reprinted in part. The Complete story can be found at: Full Story

 

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Honey and Weight Loss:

 

1. Replace Empty-Calorie Sugars with Honey

     to Promote Metabolism

honey and weight loss

Refined dietary sugars lack minerals and vitamins and are often called empty calories. They draw upon the body's nutrients to be metabolized into the system, and when these nutrients are depleted, metabolizing of cholesteroland fatty acid is impeded, contributing to higher cholesterol and promotingobesity due to higher fatty acid on the organs and tissues. Eliminating or cutting down on food with empty calories in your diet is one of the best way to lose weight. The good news is that honey, a natural sweetener, on the other hand, contains 22 amino acids and a variety of minerals essential for its metabolism and hence is helpful in preventing obesity.

 

 

2. Honey Concoctions Boost Metabolism

It is believed that drinking lemon juice with a little honey the first thing in the morning is an effective anti cellulite treatment as it helps to increase body metabolism. If you are determined to shed weight and speed up your sluggish metabolism, try this honey and lemon diet tip. If you like, another very popular recipe associated with honey and weight loss is a drink that uses honey and cinnamon as ingredients. Many people have found this home remedy very effective in losing pounds. The steps are easy: Dissolve half a teaspoon of cinnamon powder (or ground cinnamon) in a cup of boiling water. Stir the mixture and cover for half an hour. Filter away any big particles and add a teaspoon of honey. Take it in the morning with an empty stomach about half an hour before breakfast.

3. Optimize Digestion for Weight Loss

A healthy digestive system can maximize your weight loss efforts. For people who tend to overeat or feel discomfort in the stomach after meals, honey can be taken for better digestion. Honey is a simple carbohydrate that one safely take during fasting because it contains easily digested sugars. Foods that are rich in sugars or complexes of sugars are carbohydrates. How the sugars are arranged will determine whether we call a food a source of simple or complex carbohydrates. When sugars are bound into rows, as they are in starches such as whole grains and legumes, they are called complex carbohydrates. It takes the body much longer to digest the sugar from a complex carbohydrate.

4. Honey the Gold Standard for Liver Glycogen

The latest theory based on the hibernation diet also builds a link between honey and weight loss. Honey has been identified as the most ideal food to stock liver glycogen during sleep. The diet suggests taking a generous spoonful or two of honey at night, either as a warm drink or straight from the jar, and promises to help us sleep and lose weight at the same time by fuelling the liver, speeding up fat-burning metabolism and easing stress hormones. Get details in: Hibernation Diet Links Sleep and Obesity.

And if you are considering artificial sugar or sweetener like Aspartame to help you lose weight, you are putting yourself completely on the wrong track. It might get you off from a few calories but it gives you a bunch of other serious health problems. Read about this sweet poison in The Silent, Sweet Killer -- Aspartame

 

Reprinted in part. The Complete story can be found at: Full Story

 

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3 Reasons Why Honey Should Not Be Banned in Diabetic Diet

The diabetic diet is strictly controlled in terms of sugar and mineral compounds intake. Hence it's not surprising that "whether honey is allowed for diabetic patients" is a frequently asked question.

Diabetes is a deficiency of the pancreas, whereby insulin is not produced sufficiently or utilized properly. It's basically a disorder of metabolism, primarily that of carbohydrates. The ingested sugars and starches cannot be deployed, and hence are eliminated in the urine.

 

Symptoms of diabetes include frequent urination, extreme thirst or hunger, weight loss, fatigue, numbness, and infections. There are 2 types of diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn't produce any insulin, whereas, people with type 2 diabetes either don't produce enough insulin or their cells resist the insulin, and they tend to be overweight, because the high insulin levels, unable to channel glucose into muscle cells, convert glucose into fat and cholesterol instead. This results not only in obesity, but also very often heart disease, poor blood circulation in the legs and eye diseases. While type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin injections, which help glucose get into the body cells and maintain blood glucose control, type 2 diabetics commonly use glucose-lowering drugs. Most diabetics are type 2 and are usually in their 40s.

 

1. Not All Sweeteners are
Made Equal

You get (99 per cent of the time) a "no-no" answer when you ask doctors if honey is allowed for diabetics. With appropriate control, many diabetics and pre-diabetes (people with blood glucose levels higher than normal person but not high enough to be considered diabetic) are still able to safely enjoy natural honey (Journal of Medicinal Food, September 2007, 10(3): 473-478). Before incorporating honey into their meal planning, find out how much of the sweet liquid can be consumed on a daily basis. Each diabetic is different and should learn how his or her body reacts to different foods containing carbohydrates. Bear in mind that the total amount of starches or

carbohydrates in a food is the key consideration, not the amount of sugar. Honey is a carb food as well, just like rice, potatoes, thus just keep in mind that 1 tablespoon of honey has approximately 17 grams of carbohydrate, and taking that into account when counting your total daily intake of carbohydrates, diabetics can work it out just like any other sweetener or carbohydrates. To monitor response to honey, blood sugar levels could be noted before consumption and again two hours later. Also, when purchasing commercial honey for diabetic patients, be sure that it is pure and not adulterated by glucose, starch, cane sugar, and even malt, which is to better to be avoided in a diabetic diet.

 

2. Honey is Gentle on Blood Sugar

This is not surprising as the idea of eating honey to regulate blood glucose seems rather counter intuitive. But did they ever tell you that clinical studies have shown that pure honey is a healthier choice in diabetic diet than table sugar and any other non-nutritive sweeteners such as Splenda, saccharin, aspartame?

Honey requires lower levels of insulin compared to regular white sugar and does not raise blood sugar levels as rapidly as table sugar, that is, it has a lower Glycemic Index than sugar. Though honey contains a significant amount of sugar, it consists largely of two simple individual units of sugar - glucose and fructose, which are absorbed at different rates into the body (Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 2013 Feb;19(1):15-9). In fact, Dr Ron Fessenden reveals in his book, The Honey Revolution that "the more glucose intolerant one is, the lower the blood sugar response after honey ingestion versus the higher the blood sugar response after consuming sucrose or glucose". The book further explains why honey is able to

https://ws-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/q?_encoding=UTF8&ASIN=1498400671&Format=_SL160_&ID=AsinImage&MarketPlace=US&ServiceVersion=20070822&WS=1&tag=benefitsofhon-20http://ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=benefitsofhon-20&l=as2&o=1&a=1498400671perform this remarkable regulatory role. The perfect one-to-one ratio of fructose and glucose found in honey facilitates glucose intake to the liver, hence preventing an overload of glucose entering the blood circulation. And nature's honey is the only sugar that possesses this special ability.

 

3. Honey Has Safe Metabolic Effects

honey in diabetic diet imageNext, the use of monosaccharide fructose is often recommended to sweeten the diet of diabetics due to its significantly lower GI. The trouble is, fructose is absorbed differently than other sugars. It is not utilized for energy like glucose, but stored in the liver as triglycerides. This presents a great metabolism burden on the liver and can eventually lead to major health issues related to obesity and further health damages for diabetics. Sadly, in their quest to avoid sugar in foods, many diabetics miss the point when they start to plan their diet around "fructose fruit sugar", "diabetic birthday cake", "NutraSweet ice-cream", "sugar-free candies", etc, which all contain corn syrup or artificial sweeteners that can be potentially even more harmful than regular sugar when consumed in the long term.

Reprinted in part. The Complete story can be found at: Full Story

 

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Apple Cider Vinegar and Honey Remedy

 

The health benefits of the apple cider vinegar and honey drink are widely known. This recipe has traditionally been used as an at-home self-remedy for many ailments, and even as an anti-aging elixir. Many people have recognized and made use of its cleansing and disinfecting properties to self-detoxify their body. It is seen as a powerful cleansing agent and natural healing elixir with naturally occurring antibiotic and antiseptic that fights germs and bacteria.

Alkaline-Forming Diet

So, how does this vinegar and honey remedy work? As pointed out by most nutrition mantras, a person's bloodstream tends toward becoming acidic with our modern diet of fats, starches and processed foods, (e.g. fast foods, meats, peanuts, seafoods, alcohol and coffee) and if your body is acidic, disease can flourish; if it is alkaline, it is in balance and can fight off germs and ailments such as bladder and kidney conditions, osteoporosis, brittle bones, joint pains, aching muscles, low energy and chronic fatigue, and slow digestion.

 

 

Raw fruits, leafy green vegetables, legumes, and tea are examples of alkaline forming foods. Interestingly and ironically, a food's acid or alkaline-forming tendency in the body has nothing to do with the actual pH of the food itself. For instance, lemons and limes are very acidic, however the end-products they produce after digestion and assimilation are very alkaline so lemons and limes are alkaline-forming in the body. Likewise, meat will test alkaline before digestion but it leaves very acidic residue in the body so, like nearly all animal products, meat is very acid-forming. It is important to know that stomach acid or the pH of the stomach is an entirely different matter from the pH of the body's fluids and tissues.

The body has an acid-alkaline (or acid-base) ratio called the pH which is a balance between positively charges ions (acid-forming) and negatively charged ions (alkaline-forming). When this balance is compromised many problems can occur. The body is forced to borrow minerals, including calcium, sodium, potassium and magnesium from vital organs and bones to neutralize the acid and safely remove it from the body. And severe damage can be done to the body due to high acidity. Ideally, for most people, the ideal diet is 75 percent alkalizing and 25 percent acidifying foods by volume. Allergic reactions and other forms of stress also tend to produce excessive acids in the body. The alkaline-forming ability of apple cider vinegar can correct excess acidity in our system and help prevent and fight infection.

 

Acidity of Vinegar for Health

Dr. D. C. Jarvis, the author of the famous book "Folk Medicine" (1958), and great advocate of the vinegar and honey drink however explains the benefits of the concoction differently from the above theory. No reference of alkaline foods and acid producing foods was made in his premise. Instead he expounded on how cider vinegar could effectively acidify the urine and prevent urinary tract infections, and how the acidification of the vinegar could prevent colds, sinusitis, neuralgia, digestive ailments, headaches, and a myriad of other ailments. He also postulated that the powerful acidity of the vinegar could dissolve calcium deposits in the joints of the body in arthritic patients. Today, cider vinegar and honey is known to be an effective remedy for rheumatism and arthritis.

 

 

How about honey?

Every sweet food has a low pH and that is the nature of sugar. However, bees' honey is unique. Researchers have discovered that 45 minutes after eating raw honey, blood tests showed more alkalinity. Diabetics also have lower blood sugar 45 minutes after eating honey. This is because, unlike processed sugar and artificial sweeteners, honey is very quickly absorbed into the body cells for fuel use, rather than sitting in the blood.

 

When you first drink the apple cider vinegar formula, it might not taste too pleasant, especially if your taste buds don't take well to fermented juice, but this is subjective. Nevertheless, the taste is often acquired over time and as your body becomes less acidic and more alkaline, it tends to taste better. While honey added to the vinegar does naturally make the mixture a lot more drinkable for most people, the purpose of mixing honey goes beyond pleasing the taste buds. D.C. Jarvis, M.D in his book, Folk Medicine (1958) recommends adding honey as it enhances the healing power of the vinegar. He even has a special name for this honey and cider vinegar drink - Honegar.

11 Amazing Cures of Apple Cider Vinegar and Honey

The ailments that could be cured by this apple cider vinegar and honey treatment include:

1. Premature aging 
2. Obesity
3. Food poisoning 
4. Heat exhaustion
5. Acid Reflux/ Heartburn

6. Brittle nails
7. Bad breath
8. Arthritis
9. High blood pressure
10. High cholesterol level
11. Eczema

Reprinted in part. The Complete story can be found at: Full Story

 

Thank You
 
         
Ginger & Charles


 

"Why Bee Pollen Has Super
Healing Power"

 

Bee pollen is the male seed of a flower blossom which are collected by the honey bees and mixed with the bees' digestive enzymes. It's a blend of sticky pollen granules that could contain up to five million pollen spores each

1. A Perfect Food

Raved by many scientists as a complete nutrition, a super nutritious, perfect food, these tiny pollens contain almost all the nutrients required by the human body and are enormously rich in proteins, vitamins, minerals, beneficial fatty acids, carotenoids, and bioflavonoids which are anti-viral, antibacterial and helpful in lowering cholesterol, stabilizing and strengthening capillaries. Pollen is the only plant source that contains the exclusive vitamin B12

2. Rich in Amino Acids

Fresh pollens contain a wide spectrum of at least 20 amino acids which are the building blocks of protein needed to build every cell in the body, from blood cell to the cells in the skin, organs and bones.

3. Abundant in Enzymes

There are also more than 100 active enzymes present in fresh and unheated pollens. Eating foods that contain enzymes helps the body prevent and fight diseases such as cancer and arthritis and saves the body from having to make enzymes, a process that depletes energy.

4. Detox and Cleanse to Aid Healing

Applied to the skin, these pollens are also believed to be helpful in healing wounds and acne. Appreciated for years as an excellent weight control, bee pollen is low in calories and contains natural Phenylalanine, an amino acid that acts as appetite suppressant and Lecithin that helps dissolve and flush fat from the body, that is, detoxification and cleansing. Its ability to rejuvenate the body, stimulates organs, enhances vitality aBee pollen is the male seed of a flower blossom which are collected by the honey bees and mixed with the bees' digestive enzymes. It's a blend of sticky pollen granules that could contain up to five million pollen spores each.

 

10 Most Common Uses of Bee Pollen

1. Strengthening Immunity Functions
2. Children's Physical & Brain Development
3. Asthma
4. Adrenal Fatigue
5. Fertility Booster
6. Weight Management
7. Choleserol and Triglycerides Reduction
8. Relieve Diabetic Symptoms
9. Skin Related Ailments, eg ezcema, hives, rashes.
10. Longevity

 

How to Use Bee Pollen

High-quality, fresh pollen consists of soft, fragrant, pliable granules that are neither pasteurized nor heated. These tiny yellow, orange, or brown granules can be chewed direct. They also come in the capsule and tablet forms. The taste of pollen varies depending on the flower and nectar source it comes from. Some pollen has a slightly sweet and nut-like flavor, while some pollen tastes bitter. If you try pollen from different sources, you would be surprised how much its taste can vary. Bee pollen is very versatile; you can choose to mix the granules with any food you like. However, eating it raw is best, never cook it or add it to boiling water or food that requires heating. Heat destroys the live enzymes in the pollen and lowers its nutritional value. Some parents suggest blending it together with fruits to form a delicious smoothie for their young children who would require all the essential amino acids, minerals, vitamins to grow strong and healthy, while others prefer to sprinkle the granules on pancake, toasted waffle, or granola. There are also people who prefer to chew it directly. Many shared with me that their appreciation for pollen is a taste acquired over time.

For me, I like to pre-grind small batches of the pollen granules into power form in advance to store so that I can conveniently use half a teaspoon each time I mix a warm chocolate drink (not more than 50 degrees C.). (See a picture of my finely ground pollen above.) Young children tend to fight against the graininess of the pollen initially when it is introduced into their diet, but they gradually come to terms with it after getting used to it and experiencing the benefits for themselves and seeing that they are so much less prone to flu and cold attacks after starting on the pollen. The difference it brings in terms of boosting immunity and strength is too obvious to be ignored. Many kids in fact eventually also realize that pollens are quite fragrant after all!

"Bee pollen - the greatest body builder on Earth." 
~ German naturalist 
Francis Huber

Recommendations on Dosage and Allergy Caution
 

For adults, take 1-2 teaspoons daily and for children, half to a teaspoon daily, at any time of the day. It's just a guide for newbies to this nutritious food, you can increase the amount to consume as you go along and monitor your body's response to it. There is no hard and fast rules on how it should be consumed, unlike conventional synthetic drugs and supplements. It can be chewed directly or crushed/ground and mixed with any food (Note: Crushing breaks the hard outer pollen shell and helps ingestion of the pollen).

Bee pollen is not the same as allergy causing pollen that is dry, lightweight and is carried easily by the wind. It rarely cause allergy symptoms. However, if you have a concern about developing an allergic reaction, you may want to start with placing just a tiny bit of pollen (a granule or two) under your tongue and monitor if there are any side effects such as itchy throat, tearing eyes, headache. The amount can be gradually increased over time after having assured that the consumption is safe.

nd accelerate rate of recovery makes it a popular home remedy and tonic among athletes and sportsmen. Despite the many thousands of chemical analyses conducted in the laboratory with the most advanced diagnostic technology to create a synthetic version, scientists are still unable to identify some elements present in the pollens. The bees must have added some mysterious goodness of their own that cannot be copied and replaced by any man-made food!

"Bee pollen - the greatest body builder on Earth." 
~ German naturalist 
Francis Huber

Our Special Offer For Trying Our All Natural Bee Pollen:
Save 20%
Use Promo Code: Pollen20

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Honey Vs Sugar

Table sugar is sucrose, which is made up of two molecules bonded together. When we eat table sugar, our stomach has to use its own enzymes to separate the molecules apart before we can use the sugar's energy. Honey is quite different. The bees have added a special enzyme to the nectar that divides the sucrose into glucose and fructose -- two simple sugars for our bodies can absorb directly.

Hence, honey vs sugar, honey has a healthier Glycemic Index (GI) which measures the negative impact of a given food on the blood-glucose level. The lower the GI rating, the slower the absorption and infusion of sugars into the bloodstream and hence a more gradual and healthier digestion process (The Glycemic Index).

 

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What is a swarm?

Part of the reproductive lifecycle of the honey bee is called swarming, an event in which a new colony is produced from an existing colony. The swarm leaves the parent colony and is a transient group, consisting of one queen and many worker honey bees that exists for just a short time (a few hours to a few days). A swarm ranges in size from that of a baseball to that of a basketball. A swarm will usually find an easy place to “rest”; on a fence, a plant, a tree branch, and then when the swarm’s ‘scout bees’ find a suitable place to settle, the colony building begins. This hanging swarm is what a lot of people see, and can sometimes get worried about. But a swarm is the most docile formation of bees, at this stage, they have nothing to defend and therefore pose little to no threat to people, as bees in a swarm tend not to sting. Swarms are relatively easy to remove for a business like ours and incurs no harm to the bees at all.

 

 

 


 

Raw Honey Contains Probiotic that Boosts Immunity.

Written by: Case Adams, Naturopath

July 7th 2015

The probiotic of the beehive

The probiotic bacteria is Lactobacillus kunkeei. This bacteria was initially studied in relation to winemaking, because it was often found when a winemaking fermentation process became "stuck." As such, the bacteria has been implicated among spoilage disasters in winemaking and grape juice processors.

But Lactobacillus kunkeei has more recently been found among honeybees, and a new sequencing method employed at the Prefectural University of Hiroshima has found that this probiotic bacteria is not only used by honeybees: It is also contained in the honey, bee pollen and royal jelly produced in the hive.

This also means that by eating raw honey, we may be consuming this probiotic bacteria as well. Is it good for us?

 

"© [July 7th, 2015] GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here http://www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter."

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Picture of Ingredients & Materials

Methods for Infusing Honey

(When infusing "Raw Honey" the Cold Slow Method is preferable)

 

Easy tutorial for infusing your own honey at home in two different ways.

Honey is a delicious and beneficial natural sweetener that can be added to enhance a wide variety of foods and dishes. It's mild flavor profile can also easily take on the delightful and welcome flavor of most herbs, spices, flowers, and fruit peels through the process of infusion. Infused honey also makes a great homemade gift for the friends and families in your life.

This Instructable will detail two ways to infuse your honey. The first technique is a "fast" infusion method utilizing heat. The second method is a "slow" infusion that uses time instead of heat. Each has it's own benefits, use whichever you feel more comfortable with. No matter which method you use, steps 1-5 are the same and should be followed for both fast and slow methods.

 

Step 1: Ingredients & Materials

 

You’ll need the following:

•            Honey

•            Herbs and Spices to Flavor*

•            Tea Bags

•            Honey Dipper**

•            Double Boiler

•            Glass Jars with Lids

•            Zester/Grater

•            Knife

•            Cutting Board

•            Measuring Cups

*NOTE: You can choose any herbs and spices that you’d like to infuse your honey with. For this Instructable I infused three different honey batches with Vanilla & Orange, Rosemary, and Hot Chili. Other combinations could include: Green Tea, Thyme, Lemon Zest, Sage, Allspice, Mint, Ginger, or any combination of the above. As always, get created. I would avoid fruit and stick to fruit zest if possible.



**OPTIONAL

Step 2: Sterilize Your Jars

 

Fill a large pot with water. Place your jars and their lids inside the pot, submerging them in the water. Bring to a boil and continue to boil for 10 minutes. This will clean and sterilize your jars before you put your infused honey in them, reducing the risk of bacteria. Allow your jars to cool while you start to infuse your honey.

 

Step 3: Wash

  

Wash any herbs or fruit you may be using under a steady stream of cold water. Allow your washed items to dry. This will prevent bacteria from getting into your new batch of honey. You'll also want to make sure that your herbs and/or fruit are completely dry before adding them to the honey, you don't want any water in your finished honey.

 

 

Step 4: Prepare & Chop

 

After your herbs or fruit have dried you can prepare them for infusion. I like to chop herbs and/or muddle my spices to release more of the aromatic flavors. You can use whole herb leaves, but you will need more of them for the infusion.

You can adapt the strength of the flavor in your infusion to your own personal preference. Add more spices/herbs for a stronger flavor and less of each for a milder flavor. Get creative! I used the following amounts for my infusions:

Vanilla & Orange Honey:

•            1/2 Cup of Grade A Honey

•            Zest from 1/2 of a Large Organic Navel Orange

•            1/2 Chopped Vanilla Bean

Rosemary Honey:

•            1/2 Cup of Grade A Honey

•            2 Rosemary Sprigs Chopped (each sprig was roughly 4")

Hot Pepper Honey:

•            1/2 Cup of Grade A Honey

•            1 Thai Chili Chopped (can be substituted with other peppers)
 

 

Step 5: Tea Bags

 

You can steep your honey with loose herbs and spices but then you will have to strain your honey mixture at the end, or be okay with solids in your finished product. Instead, I prefer to place all of my herbs and spices for the infusion in a loose leaf tea bag. This will allow for the honey to soak in the aromatic flavors you've chosen, but also allow for easy removal when you are done.

For this step, place your prepared (chopped, muddled, or zested) herbs and spices in an empty loose leaf tea bag and twist the top to help the bag remained closed.



Step 6: Fast Infusion

 

This is technique #1: The Fast Infusion. This technique utilizes heat to help the honey quickly absorb the flavor profile of the herbs/spices that you are using to infuse with. It is beneficial in that it can be used in a pinch to create a flavored honey for a cheese plate or last minute dessert. It does however heat the honey, which can eliminate some of honey's natural benefits. Nonetheless, it's delicious and works wonderfully.

1.           Set up your double broiler.

2.           Pour ½ cup of Honey into your double broiler.

3.           Add your tea bag of herbs and spices.

4.           Slowly heat your honey until it reaches a temperature of 185F (85C). Keep your honey mixture
              steeping at 185F for ten minutes.

5.           Remove from heat and allow your honey to cool for 10 minutes.

6.           Remove your tea bag from the honey.

7.           Gently and carefully pour your honey into your sterilized jars.

8.           Screw on the lid. You’re done!

 

Step 7: Slow Infusion

 

This is method #2: The Slow Infusion. This particular infusion will take up to 2 weeks for your honey to absorb the flavor profiles of the herbs and spices you are infusing.

1.           Untwist your tea bag and tie a knot in it instead to secure your infusion spices and herbs.

2.           Place your prepared tea bags into one of your sterilized jars.

3.           Pour honey over the top of the tea bag, filling the jar.

4.           Screw on your jar lid tightly.

5.           Let your jar of honey sit for up to 2 weeks to absorb the flavors.

6.           Invert your honey jar whenever your tea bag floats to the surface to keep your herbs and spices   
              submerged and to mix the honey ever so slightly.

After two weeks your honey should be infused to it's maximum intensity. Open your jar and remove your
tea bag. Replace your jar lid, screwing it on tightly. You're done!

 

Step 8: Enjoy
 

You’re done! Use your newly infused honey anywhere you’d regularly use honey. It is a wonderful and flavorful addition to tea, baked goods, or tagines. My new personal favorite use for my honey is to lightly drizzle it over vanilla ice cream.

Your newly infused honey also makes a great gift. Simply label it or tie a ribbon around it and proudly gift it to friends and family.

 

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What Makes our "Annual Local Raw

Honey" The Best for Allergy Relief.

 

Most people that Ginger & I come in contact with, fully understand the concept of Local Raw Honey for allergy relief.  However why do we say our Annual Honey is the Best Honey for allergy relief?  Of course, the concept that introducing minute amounts of the pollen (allergens) to which you are allergic develops your immune system and therefore making you immune to those allergens. 

Here is the point, when you purchase some other Local Raw Honey for allergy relief, which allergens (pollen) were in bloom and therefore in the honey?  Even if you could identify the location, and the time the bees made the honey, you are only protecting yourself against the allergens in bloom at that that time. 

Here is the solution, (many of you have heard us say this many times) Our honey is a combination (a mixture) of All Four Seasons, therefore all the allergen For The Year are in our 22 oz jar of "Annual Local Raw Honey".  Threat yourself by taking a teaspoon a day, every day, for 30 days and don't heat up the honey and you will be treating yourself for all the possible allergies for the year.

 

Okay we have left some things unsaid, what is local, and what was in bloom when the bees harvested the Nectar and made the honey.  These among other elements of our honey, which we believe makes it better than other's honey are left for another time or stop by our booth on the weekend and we will give you all the details.

 

Thank You

        
Ginger & Charles

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Easy Face Mask Recipes for Different Skin

Types

Here are some really simple DIY face mask recipes that have become very popular among honey enthusiasts. The steps and ingredients involved in each mask are so easy that you can prepare it in a few minutes. Pick one that suits your skin type and you are on your way to discovering many benefits of honey for your skin!

Simplest Face Mask With Just Honey

This is the simplest natural beauty recipe. It has only one ingredient - raw honey. It is so mild on the skin that most people especially those with sensitive skin can benefit from its gentle cleansing and purifying effects. Just apply a spoon of raw honey on the face as a mask and leave it for about 20 minutes. Rinse off. Repeat a few times a week.

 

For . . .

 Normal Skin: Apple Honey Mask


 Dry Skin: Avocado & Honey Face Mask

 

 Dry Skin: Honey and Egg Mask

 

 Tired Skin: Almond Yoghurt Honey Mask

 

 Oily Skin: Honey-Papaya Mask

 

 Oily Skin: Carrot Face Mask

 

 Sensitive Skin: Banana and Honey Mask

 

 All Skin Types: Honey and Lavender Facial Mask

 

Skin Lightening Effect (All Skin Types): Honey and Lemon Facial Mask

For Instructions for all of the above treatments follow
the link below.

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Milk and Honey Recipe for Good Health

 

How about taking a glass of sour milk and honey at the start of each day?

 

Bifidobacteria is a group of good, friendly bacteria which are essential for life and good health and particularly important to the health and proper function of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. One way to increase the Bifidobacteria populations in the intestine is by consuming foods containing prebiotics -- nutrients that stimulate the growth of probiotic Acidophillus and Bifidus bacteria. Research conducted at Michigan State University has shown that honey, a natural sweetener comprising vitamins, enzymes, minerals, and antioxidants, contains a number of fermentable carbohydrates including a variety of oligosaccharides that can function as prebiotics and enhance the growth, activity and viability of bifidobacteria in milk, and fermented dairy products such as yoghurts.

 

Honey & Milk

Honey is known as a compound made up of fructose sugar molecules linked together in long chains -- fructooligosaccharide (FOS), which can also be found in other plants such as Jerusalem artichoke tubers, onions, leeks, barley, rye, oats. FOS are also available as a nutritional supplement and the food industry is jumping on the band wagon by adding FOS such as honey to yoghurts, and combining milk and honey to form healthy food. Benefits of FOS are numerous. They help carry moisture through the digestive system and therefore promoting healthy bowel movements. Growth of the beneficial bacteria encourages the production of short chain fatty acids, lowering pH, inhibiting unhealthy bacteria and detoxifying carcinogens in the diet. FOS also helps to lower blood sugar and cholesterol levels by reducing absorption of carbohydrates and fats into the blood stream, nourishes the cells in the gut which is important for digestive well-being and the prevention of constipation. Improving digestion is key to establishing good health. When in good health, we get rid of wastes and toxins through regular bowel movements and eliminate the build up of unhealthy micro-organisms and internal toxins, providing a strong and intact intestinal barrier to prevent the leaking of undigested food fragments into the blood stream.

 

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Honey Ginger Remedy

 

What is this?

Honey ginger is an ancient tonic particularly popular in Asian, Indian, and Arabic herbal traditions and cultures whereby honey water is used as a medium for transmitting the benefits of the ginger root to the body. Read below for its many medicinal benefits without all the side-effects of synthetic medicines.

All you would need are:

1 tablespoon of freshly grated/finely chopped ginger
1 tablespoon honey
1 cup of hot water/tea

Ready to go in just a few simple steps:

1. Prepare the grated ginger in a cup and pour hot boiling water/tea.
2. Let it steep for 5-10 minutes and remove the ginger with a strainer.
3. Add honey when the drink has cooled down to some extent.

 

Many Health Benefits:

The honey and ginger tonic is best known as a remedy for digestive issues. Like a natural herbal antibiotic, the spicy mixture, with its broad-spectrum of inherent antibacterial, antiviral and anti-parasitic properties, volatile oils and phenol compounds, is touted for the following medicinal benefits:

1. Stimulates the body immunity of those with a weak digestion system.
2. Fights toxins, aids in moving food through the stomach and digestive tract.
3. Treats stomach upset, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.
4. Relieve bloating sensation and colic conditions.

As the ginger root is a superb source of antioxidants such as gingerols, zingerones and shogaols, a warm honey ginger drink is also a popular cold regiment for many people who are dealing with common cold and flu symptoms. With a squeeze of fresh lemon juice added, this tangy drink effectively:
1. Soothes scratchy throat.
2. Acts as an excellent expectorant for cough.
3. Helps clear sinuses.
4. Provides good relief from headache, and runny nose.

Other frequently cited benefits of this old school concoction are associated with its effectiveness as a natural pain killer. They are:
1. Reducing inflammation, it alleviates swelling and pain in arthritis case.
2. Alleviating pains from migraines.
3. Relieving discomfort from menstrual cramps.

 

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WHAT'S IN HONEY?

 Honey is a supersaturated sugar solution with approximately 17.1 percent water. Fructose is the predominant sugar at 38.5 percent, followed by glucose at 31 percent. Disac- charides, trisac -charides and oligosaccharides are present in much smaller quantities. Besides carbohydrates, honey contains small amounts of protein, enzymes, vitamins and minerals. Honey is known to be rich in both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, including catalase, ascorbic acid, flavonoids and alkaloids. Although appearing only in trace amounts honey also contains about 18 different amino acids. Crane, E. 1976. "Honey: A Comprehensive Survey," Corrected edition. International Bee Research Association/Heinemann, London; Berenbaum, M., Robinson, G. and Unnevehr, L. 1995-1996. Antioxidant properties of Illinois honeys. University of Illinois.

 

GRANULATION (OR CRYSTALLIZATION)

Is defined as a natural occurring process of honey that changes it from liquid to solid. Some people think the honey is spoiled as it crystallizes but according to the chart, crystallization in honey occurs when the honey molecules are at optimum temperature. It then begins to crystallize. This has a lot to do with how you store you honey. If you store your honey above 60 degrees Fahrenheit (or in a certain containers the optimum is 57 to 58 degrees) it will crystallize. Levulose and dextrose levels affect crystallization also, so typically the one with the higher dextrose will crystallize more quickly; for example, Clover and Alfalfa crystallize more quickly than Orange Blossom or Blackberry. Also larger quantities will crystallize if they are stored on a concrete floor and the cold temperatures are drawn up into the container. If the honey re-crystallizes very quickly it only means that the honey did not get properly liquefied which means that the sugar crystals did not get dissolved. So if you place your honey in a pan of water and heat it slowly making sure you dissolve all the crystals you can slow crystallization or it will re-crystallize within just a few days.

 

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What is Organic Honey. . .  Know the Facts

 

The organic label is widely abused by disreputable producers and importers, probably because producing honey to organic guidelines is complex and expensive, and as there is no legal definition for organic U.S. honey, why bother?  There are various beekeeping association recommendations and guidelines (not laws) for organic honey production.  These state amongst other things that land within a certain radius of the hive, say four miles (where the bees are likely to fly) has to have adequate organic sources of food and a low risk of the bees collecting contaminated nectar, say from crops sprayed with chemicals, or from freeway or urban pollution.  This means of course that if a law came in along those lines, only a few U.S. producers in really remote areas would be able to produce organic honey.  This may explain why there is no such law for U.S. honey:

U.S. Organic Honey
 

Honey is currently NOT included in the USDA’s National Organic Standard according to a recent policy statement by the USDA’s National Organic Program.  This basically means that there is no legal definition of organic U.S. honey.  However, the USDA does allow honey to be labeled “organic” provided its producer has had its honey certified as organic by one of the 120 or so USDA-accredited certified agents; typically this applies to honey imported into the U.S.  The big problem is this – the policy states that a non-U.S. producer’s certifying agent must apply rules as strict as the U.S. rules – but there are NO U.S. rules specifically for honey, which is why it is some people argue it is easier to gain organic status for non-U.S. honey, some of which would not be considered organic by the average consumer.

Arthur Harvey of the International Association of Organic Inspectors, who is also a Maine beekeeper, stated in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper at the end of 2008 that “what the USDA has said is that you can certify any product as organic as long as you comply with existing regulation, but there are no regulations for honey.  That means the green USDA organic sticker on honey is meaningless.”  In fact, the USDA states that honey should never be labeled with the USDA organic logo at all.  Instead it should carry the logo of the accredited agent that certified it as organic.

 

Jerry Hayes, chief of the beekeeping section of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, confirmed that there are no organic standards for honey produced in the United States, but in fact Florida is leading the way in ensuring honey quality.  It already has 15 inspectors and a laboratory dedicated to this task, and is soon to pass a state law that will define exactly what a jar must contain if it is to be labeled as honey at all, let alone organic.  It is hoped that this law will eventually be used as a template for a national law that will end all of the confusion.

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HOW TO KNOW WHEN TO HARVEST HONEY

FROM YOUR BEEHIVE.

 

Generally speaking, beekeepers harvest their honey at the conclusion of a substantial nectar flow and when the beehive is filled with cured and capped honey. Conditions and circumstances vary greatly across the country. First-year beekeepers are lucky if they get a small harvest of honey by late summer. That’s because a new colony needs a full season to build up a large enough population to gather a surplus of honey.

 

When a shallow frame contains 80 percent or more of sealed, capped honey, you’re welcome to remove and harvest this frame. Or, you can practice patience, leave your frames on and wait until one of the following is true:

 

The bees have filled all the frames with capped honey.

 

The last major nectar flow of the season is complete.

 

Honey in open cells (not capped with wax) can be extracted if it is cured. To see if it’s cured, turn the frame with the cells facing the ground. Give the frame a gentle shake. If honey leaks from the cells, it isn’t cured and shouldn’t be extracted. This stuff is not even honey. It’s nectar that hasn’t been cured. The water content is too high for it to be considered honey. Attempting to bottle the nectar results in watery syrup that is likely to ferment and spoil.

 

After the last major nectar flow and winter looms on the distant horizon, bees begin consuming the honey they’ve made. If you leave supers on the hive long enough, the bees will eat much of the honey you’d hoped to harvest. Or they will start moving it to open cells in the lower deep hive bodies. Either way, you have lost the honey that should have been yours. Get those supers off the hive before that happens!

 

If you wait too long to remove your supers, the weather turns too cold to harvest your honey. In cool weather, honey can thicken or even granulate, which makes it impossible to extract from the comb. Remember that honey is easiest to harvest when it still holds the warmth of summer and can flow easily.

 

Reprinted in part from Beekeeping for Dummies.
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What is Creamed Honey & How to Make It:



 

Purchase Creamed Honey: Click
 

Making creamed honey is easy to do.  You don't have to be a beekeeper to make it. That's because all you need is… liquid honey and some seed honey.

Over time natural honey will soon develop large chunky crystals. It's not a sign that the honey is bad and the honey won't taste any different. It's just that the crystals aren't so pleasant on the tongue. These crystals have square corners that feel sharp and give an unpleasant sensation.

Enter Prof. Dyce from the University of Cornell. He developed a process to control the formation of crystals so that smooth oval shaped crystals are created. These are very spreadable and smooth on the tongue.

But how do you get these smooth oval crystals in your honey?

It's easy: You buy them.

Visit your local established beekeeper. He'll have creamed honey on hand. Try it first, paying attention not to the flavor of the honey but to the feel and sensation of the crystals on your tongue. If they're appealing, then buy some.

Use that creamed honey to seed your clear honey by inserting a tababout two weeks. Presto! You'll have smooth, non-drip, spreadable creamed honey. Your own honey givlespoon or more into a jar. Then stir the crystals in thoroughly and put the whole thing in the fridge for es the flavor but the smooth seed crystals give the texture.

How does this happen? Our favorite golden liquid has a trick or two up its sleeve. If you give clear honey smooth crystals it will replicate them naturally. The term is 'following suit'. The small crystals prevent the formation of larger crystals. It's very similar to how yogurt and cheese are made, although they use cultures as seed.

By the way, other terms for creamed honey are Whipped Honey, Spun Honey, Churned Honey, Candied Honey, Honey Fondant and Set Honey. All are processed naturally through controlling the crystallization.

Beekeepers don't forget this is another product line you can sell.  Non-drip creamed honey is great for kids and not so messy.  Moms have less clean up in the kitchen and that's a big selling point.

Honey can be stirred using an electric drill - see photo below.  This is a paint stirring drill attachment that I purchased from the local hardware store

 

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What is Royal Jelly?

Royal jelly is a milky-white secretion produced by glands of worker honeybees to induce the superior growth and development of the queen bee. Royal jelly is the principal food of the honeybee queen.

 

What is it used for?

Traditional/Ethnobotanical uses

Because of their specialized nutrition, queen bees differ from workers in several ways. The queens are approximately twice the size, they lay approximately 2,000 eggs a day (female worker bees are infertile), and they live 5 to 8 years (approximately 40 times longer than worker bees).

These differences have led to the marketable assumption that ingestion of this product will do as much for humans as it does for bees; that is, increase size, improve fertility, and enhance longevity. In many countries, royal jelly has been promoted widely as a commercially available medicine, health food, and as a cosmetic (as an emollient, moisturizer, and nourishing substance). It is used in traditional medicine for longevity in Europe and Asia. Royal jelly has been sold as a skin tonic and hair growth stimulant.

General uses

Royal jelly has been studied for a variety of actions, including antibiotic, antitumor, lowering blood pressure, and regulating the immune system. Additionally, effects on cholesterol, insulin-like action, and on the nervous system and female hormonal activity have been demonstrated. However, clinical trials are lacking.

What is the recommended dosage?

Clinical trials are generally lacking in the doses recommended. Small clinical trials have used 6 to 10 g royal jelly per day for 14 to 28 days in trials evaluating the effect on cholesterol.

How safe is it?

Contraindications

Contraindications have not been identified. Allergy to bee venom is considered a relative contraindication.

Pregnancy/nursing

Information regarding safety and efficacy in pregnancy and lactation is lacking. Royal jelly has some effect on female hormonal activity.

Interactions

Case reports of blood in the urine due to increased effect of warfarin have been documented.

Side Effects

In many allergy patients, skin tests were positive for royal jelly. There have been case reports of allergy, increased effects on asthma, hypersensitivity, and death.

 

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What's Considered Good Quality Honey
 

 

What is considered as good quality honey? Even after deciding that a certain floral variety of honey would be your most favourite type of honey, many of us are often still left with the question of "How do I choose a particular floral variety of honey amongst all the countless brands and prices of honey from all over the world?" While there is no clear standard on what constitutes good honey, the quality of honey is sometimes judged by the following factors:

1. Water content

Some people believe that good quality honey essentially has a low water content as honey is likely to ferment and lose its freshness if its water content, which can be measured using a gadget called refractometer, is greater than 19%. All unpasteurized, raw honey contains wild yeasts. Due to the high sugar concentration, these yeasts will pose little risk in low moisture honey because osmosis will draw sufficient water from the yeast to force them into dormancy. However, in honey that has a higher proportion of water, there is a higher chance that the yeast may cause fermentation in storage, whereby the increase of acidity can become a quality issue for the honey.

 

Honey is hygroscopic, which means that it easily absorbs moisture from the air. Thus, in areas with a very high humidity it can be difficult to produce honey of relatively low water content. Raw honey's moisture content can be as low as 14%, and is deemed by some as more valuable. Honey containing up to 20% water is not recommended for mead-making. One simple way of judging the relative quantity of water (not purity) in honey involves taking two same-size, same-temperature, well-sealed jars of honey from different sources. Turn the two jars upside-down and watch the bubbles rise. Bubbles in the honey with more water content will rise faster.

Comment:
There are numerous other additional contributing factors to the rate in which the bubbles raise. Therefore unless you are comparing two different jars simultaneously with all other conditions being identical, it will be impossible to determine any difference.    

 

ADDITIONAL COMMENT:
Also, keep in mind that turning the jar over and loading the cap with honey allows the honey to drip through the threaded cap and creates a mess for others who open the jars later.
 

2. HMF(Hydroxymethylfurfural)

HMF is a break-down product of fructose (one of the main sugars in honey) formed slowly during storage and very quickly when honey is heated. The amount of HMF present in honey is therefore used as a guide to storage length and the amount of heating which has taken place. HMF's occurrence and accumulation in honey is variable depending on honey type. High levels of HMF may indicate excessive heating during the extraction process. Honey that is traded in a bulk form is usually required to be below 10 or 15mg/kg to enable further processing and then give some shelf life before a level of 40 mg/kg is reached. It is not uncommon for honey sold in hot climates to be well over 100 mg/kg in HMF. This is mostly due to the ambient temperatures (over 35°C) that honey is exposed to in the distribution channel. Some countries set an HMF limit for imported honey. You may also want to note the color of the honey as it sometimes may be an indicator of the length of storage or amount of exposure to heat.

 
 

3. Inverted sugars

High levels of HMF (greater than 100 mg/kg) can also be an indicator of adulteration with inverted sugars. Cane sugar or sucrose, is "inverted" by heating with a food acid, and this process creates HMF. Many food items sweetened with high fructose corn syrups, e.g. carbonated soft drinks, can have levels of HMF up to 1,000 mg/kg


 

4. Impurities

For most consumers, good quality honey is expected to be visually free of defect -- clean and clear. Honey which has a very high pollen content appears cloudy, and the presence of many other contaminations such as particles of wax, bees, splinters of wood, and dust certainly does make it look unappetising and unappealing for anyone to buy and consume, and hence it appears as if it's of very low value. Unfortunately, no matter how much food value or health benefits some of these particles like pollen can offer, this kind of honey is hard to be associated with good quality honey and is immediately rejected by most consumers at the super-mart. And this explains why it's almost impossible to find unfiltered, raw honey on the shelf. Its cloudy appearance makes them commercially unattractive. 

 

5. Color

Honey is color graded into light, amber, and dark categories which do not really have any bearing on quality. Some of the most distinctively and strongly flavored honey varieties, such as basswood, are very light, while very mild and pleasant honeys such as tulip poplar can be quite dark. Honey color is measured on the Pfund Scale in millimeters. While it is not an indicator of honey quality and there are exceptions to the rule, generally speaking, the darker color the honey, the higher its mineral contents, the pH readings, and the aroma/flavor levels. Minerals such as potassium, chlorine, sulfur, iron, manganese, magnesium, and sodium have been found to be much higher in darker honeys. 

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Whу dоеѕ Hоnеу Crуѕtаllіzе?
 

Ноnеу сrуѕtаllіzаtіоn, оftеn rеfеrrеd tо аѕ grаnulаtіоn, іѕ а nаturаl рhеnоmеnоn bу whісh hоnеу turnѕ frоm а lіquіd tо ѕеmі-ѕоlіd ѕtаtе wіth grаnulаr соmроѕіtіоn. Аftеr bеіng ехtrасtеd frоm thе hоnеусоmb, hоnеу tеndѕ tо сrуѕtаllіzе muсh fаѕtеr thаn іf іt wеrе іn thе wах сеllѕ.

 

Quіtе оftеn hоnеу сrуѕtаllіzаtіоn іѕ “mіѕundеrѕtооd” bу hоnеу соnѕumеrѕ. А numbеr оf thеm аѕѕumе thаt hоnеу сrуѕtаllіzеѕ (grаnulаtеѕ) duе tо рооr quаlіtу, bаd ѕtоrаgе оr bесаuѕе іt іѕ unnаturаl аnd аdultеrаtеd. Асtuаllу, јuѕt thе орроѕіtе hоldѕ truе. Іf hоnеу dоеѕ nоt сrуѕtаllіzе fоr а lоng tіmе, ехсерt fоr thоѕе tуреѕ оf hоnеу іn whісh thе nаturаl сrуѕtаllіzаtіоn рrосеѕѕ gоеѕ ѕlоwеr (асасіа), thаt оftеn іѕ а сlеаr іndісаtіоn fоr hоnеу аdultеrаtіоn, dіlutіоn, еtс.

Сrуѕtаllіzаtіоn bу nо mеаnѕ сhаngеѕ thе quаlіtу оf hоnеу. Іt оnlу аffесtѕ ѕоmе ехtеrnаl fеаturеѕ, lіkе сhаngе оf соlоr аnd tехturе. Тhіѕ іѕ quіtе а nаturаl рrосеѕѕ аnd іf thе hоnеу іn thе hоnеу јаr іn оur kіtсhеn hаѕ сrуѕtаllіzеd, іt dоеѕ nоt аt аll mеаn thаt іt іѕ ѕроіlt аnd іѕ nо lоngеr fіt fоr соnѕumрtіоn. Іt іѕ gооd tо knоw thаt сrуѕtаllіzаtіоn іѕ аn аttrіbutе оf Raw Nаturаl Hоnеу.

A Few More Facts About Crystallization.

Ѕіmрlу рut, hоnеу іѕ а hіghlу соnсеntrаtеd ѕugаr (саrbоhуdrаtе) ѕоlutіоn. Турісаllу, іt соntаіnѕ mоrе thаn 70% саrbоhуdrаtеѕ аnd lеѕѕ thаn 20% wаtеr. Іt іѕ оbvіоuѕ thаt іn реrсеntаgе tеrmѕ, ѕugаrѕ аrе рrеdоmіnаnt. Тhіѕ mеаnѕ thаt wаtеr іn hоnеу соntаіnѕ muсh grеаtеr аmоunt оf ѕugаrѕ thаn іt саn nаturаllу dіѕѕоlvе. Тhе оvеrаbundаnсе оf ѕugаrѕ mаkеѕ thе ѕоlutіоn unѕtаblе. Ѕіnсе еvеrуthіng іn nаturе ѕееkѕ bаlаnсе, іnсludіng hоnеу, сrуѕtаllіzаtіоn іѕ аn аbѕоlutеlу nаturаl рhеnоmеnоn whісh оссurѕ whеn gluсоѕе ѕераrаtеѕ frоm wаtеr, аftеr whісh gluсоѕе rеmаіnѕ іn thе fоrm оf сrуѕtаlѕ аnd thе іnіtіаl соnсеntrаtеd ѕоlutіоn gеtѕ іntо а bаlаnсеd ѕtаtе. Lеt uѕ gо іntо thе ѕubјесt а bіt dеереr, wіthоut соmрlісаtіng thіngѕ.

Also See Viscosity on this page (Click)

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A brief history of Honey
 

Exactly how long honey has been in existence is hard to say because it has been around since as far back as we can record. Cave paintings in Spain from 7000BC show the earliest records of beekeeping, however, fossils of honey bees date back about 150 million years! Its 'magical' properties and versatility has given honey a significant part in history:

The earliest record of keeping bees in hives was found in the sun temple erected in 2400BC near Cairo. The bee featured frequently in Egyptian hieroglyphs and, being favoured by the pharaohs, often symbolised royalty.

The ancient Egyptians used honey as a sweetener, as a gift to their gods and even as an ingredient in embalming fluid. Honey cakes were baked by the Egyptians and used as an offering to placate the gods. The Greeks, too, made honey cakes and offered them to the gods.

The Greeks viewed honey as not only an important food, but also as a healing medicine. Greek recipes books were full of sweetmeats and cakes made from honey. Cheeses were mixed with honey to make cheesecakes, described by Euripides in the fifth century BC as being "steeped most thoroughly in the rich honey of the golden bee."

The Romans also used honey as a gift to the gods and they used it extensively in cooking. Beekeeping flourished throughout the Roman empire.

Once Christianity was established, honey and beeswax production increased greatly to meet the demand for church candles.

Honey continued to be of importance in Europe until the Renaissance, when the arrival of sugar from further afield meant honey was used less. By the seventeenth century sugar was being used regularly as a sweetener and honey was used even less. 
As bees were thought to have special powers, they were often used as emblems:

Pope Urban VIII used the bee as his emblem.

The bee was the sign of the king of Lower Egypt during the First Dynasty (3,200BC).

Napoleon's flag carried a single line of bees in flight, and his robe was embroidered with bees.

In the third century BC, the bee was the emblem used on coins in the Greek city of Ephesus.

The bee was the symbol of the Greek goddess Artemis.

The bee was the emblem of eros/cupid. 

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Queen Bee Development

 

When conditions are favorable for swarming, the queen will start laying eggs in queen cups. A virgin queen will develop from a fertilized egg. The young queen larva develops differently because it is more heavily fed royal jelly, a protein-rich secretion from glands on the heads of young workers. If not for being heavily fed royal jelly, the queen larva would have developed into a regular worker bee. All bee larvae are fed some royal jelly for the first few days after hatching but only queen larvae are fed on it exclusively. As a result of the difference in diet, the queen will develop into a sexually mature female, unlike the worker bees.

Queens are raised in specially constructed queen cells. The fully constructed queen cells have apeanut-like shape and texture. Queen cells start out as queen cups. Queen cups are larger than the cells of normal brood comb and are oriented vertically instead of horizontally. Worker bees will only further build up the queen cup once the queen has laid an egg in a queen cup. In general, the old queen starts laying eggs into queen cups when conditions are right for swarming or supersedure. Swarm cells hang from the bottom of a frame while supersedure queens or emergency queens are generally raised in cells built out from the face of a frame.

As the young queen larva pupates with her head down, the workers cap the queen cell withbeeswax. When ready to emerge, the virgin queen will chew a circular cut around the cap of her cell. Often the cap swings open when most of the cut is made, so as to appear like a hinged lid.

During swarming season, the old queen will likely leave with the prime swarm before the first virgin queen emerges from a queen cell.


Virgin queen bee

A virgin queen is a queen bee that has not mated with a drone. Virgins are intermediate in size between workers and mated, laying queens, and are much more active than the latter. They are hard to spot while inspecting a frame, because they run across the comb, climbing over worker bees if necessary, and may even take flight if sufficiently disturbed. Virgin queens can often be found clinging to the walls or corners of a hive during inspections.

Virgin queens appear to have little queen pheromone and often do not appear to be recognized as queens by the workers. A virgin queen in her first few hours after emergence can be placed into the entrance of any queenless hive or nuc and acceptance is usually very good, whereas a mated queen is usually recognized as a stranger and runs a high risk of being killed by the older workers.

When a young virgin queen emerges from a queen cell, she will generally seek out virgin queen rivals and attempt to kill them. Virgin queens will quickly find and kill (by stinging) any other emerged virgin queen (or be dispatched themselves), as well as any unemerged queens. Queen cells that are opened on the side indicate that a virgin queen was likely killed by a rival virgin queen. When a colony remains in swarm mode after the prime swarm has left, the workers may prevent virgins from fighting and one or several virgins may go with after-swarms. Other virgins may stay behind with the remnant of the hive. Some virgins have been seen to escape the hive to avoid being killed and seek out another without a queen, such as in the eusocial bee Melipona scutellaris.[3] As many as 21 virgin queens have been counted in a single large swarm.[citation needed] When the after-swarm settles into a new home, the virgins will then resume normal behavior and fight to the death until only one remains. If the prime swarm has a virgin queen and the old queen, the old queen will usually be allowed to live. The old queen continues laying. Within a couple of weeks she will die a natural death and the former virgin, now mated, will take her place.

Unlike the worker bees, the queen's stinger is not barbed and she is able to sting repeatedly without dying.

 

Piping

Piping describes a noise made by virgin and mated queen bees during certain times of the virgin queens' development. Fully developed virgin queens communicate through vibratory signals: "quacking" from virgin queens in their queen cells and "tooting" from queens free in the colony, collectively known as piping. A virgin queen may frequently pipe before she emerges from her cell and for a brief time afterwards. Mated queens may briefly pipe after being released in a hive.

Piping is most common when there is more than one queen in a hive. It is postulated that the piping is a form of battle cry announcing to competing queens and the workers their willingness to fight. It may also be a signal to the worker bees which queen is the most worthwhile to support.

The piping sound is a G (aka A). The adult queen pipes for a two-second pulse followed by a series of quarter-second toots.[4] The queens of Africanized bees produce more vigorous and frequent bouts of piping.



Reproduction cycle

The surviving virgin queen will fly out on a sunny, warm day to a "drone congregation area" where she will mate with 12-15 drones. If the weather holds, she may return to the drone congregation area for several days until she is fully mated. Mating occurs in flight. The young queen stores up to 6 million sperm from multiple drones in her spermatheca. She will selectively release sperm for the remaining 2–7 years of her life.[5]

The young virgin queen has a limited time to mate. If she is unable to fly for several days because of bad weather and remains unmated, she will become a "drone layer." Drone-laying queens usually signal the death of the colony, because the workers have no fertilized (female) larvae from which to raise worker bees or a replacement queen. (Pearcy et al. 2004)

Though timing can vary, matings usually take place between the sixth and tenth day after the queen emerges. Egg laying usually begins 2 to 3 days after the queen returns to the beehive, but can start earlier than this.[6]

A special, rare case of reproduction is thelytoky: the reproduction of female workers or queens by laying worker bees. Thelytoky occurs in the Cape bee, Apis mellifera capensis, and has been found in other strains at very low frequency.

 

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Learn about Honey:

Honey, a Reference Guide to Nature’s Sweetener
 

 

Honey is honey, it’s just that simple. A bottle of pure honey contains the natural sweet substance produced by honey bees from the nectar of plants or secretions of living parts of plants. Nothing else.

When scientists begin to look for all of the elements found in this wonderful product of nature, they find a complex of naturally flavored sugars as well as trace enzymes, minerals, vitamins, and amino acids. (Complete information concerning honey’s chemical makeup and nutritional content is available in our downloadable PDF brochure, “Honey, a Reference Guide to Nature’s Sweetener”).

Honey is made by bees in one of the world’s most efficient facilities, the beehive. The 60,000 or so bees in a beehive may collectively travel as much as 55,000 miles and visit more than two million flowers to gather enough nectar to make just a pound of honey!

The color and flavor of honey differ depending on the bees’ nectar source (the blossoms). In fact, there are more than 300 unique kinds of honey in the United States, originating from such diverse floral sources as Clover, Eucalyptus and Orange Blossoms. In general, lighter colored honeys are mild in flavor, while darker honeys are usually more robust in flavor.

 

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Bee Pollen Contents and Recommended

Dosage Provided by,
Eden's Nectar

 

 

 

As found on the back of every bag of Eden's Nectar Bee Pollen.

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Pollen collection by Honey Bees

 

While we normally think of honey bees collecting nectar, an average-size colony may bring in 100 pounds of pollen in a season. Pollen is an essential part of the honey bee diet, providing a wide range of nutrients including protein, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.

Although a tough outer coating protects the pollen from environmental stressors, honey bees have enzymes in their digestive tract that split the grains apart at a weak point. The interior is then digested and the empty husks are excreted. Most of the pollen is eaten by nurse bees. They use the nutrition absorbed from it to secrete royal jelly from their hypopharyngeal glands. The jelly is fed to young larvae, including workers, drones and queens. After about three days the jelly is mixed with bee bread—a mixture of whole pollen, honey, and enzymes—and fed to the workers and drones until they spin their cocoons. The queens receive a steady diet of royal jelly throughout their development.

Most bees collect just pollen or just nectar on any trip, but a few carry both at the same time. The pollen is stuffed into hairy receptacles on their hind legs called corbiculae. A single bee can carry about half her own body weight in pollen.

Once back at the hive, the workers stuff the pollen into an awaiting cell. Unlike nectar-carrying bees, pollen-carrying bees have to off-load it themselves. In addition to depositing the pellets from their sacks, they may also groom away any pollen that is stuck to their bodies. The pollen is stored in cells at the perimeter of the brood nest, forming a ring around it. During the brood rearing season, the pollen is stored for only a few days. During the winter it is stored for much longer.

Honey bees usually forage on only one kind of flower on any single trip. This is nature’s way of assuring that plants are cross-pollinated. So a bee going to blackberries, keeps going to blackberries until there are no more blackberry flowers, then she will switch to something else. Honey bees collect pollen even from plants that don’t provide nectar, such as corn. In corn-growing regions, pesticide-contaminated corn pollen is suspected of causing severe health problems within the hive.

 

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Races of Honey Bees in North America
This is far from a complete list.  We did however choose the Bees which most may be familiar and find interesting.  Don't want to scroll through the entire list, here is a linked directory to each category for your review.
 

Italian * Cordovan * Caucasian * Carniolan * Russian * Africanized Honey Bees (AHB)

Italian

Apis mellifera ligustica. This is the most popular bee in North American. These, as all of the commercial bees, are gentle and good producers. They use less propolis than some of the darker bees. They usually have bands on their abdomen of brown to yellow color. Their biggest weakness is that they are prone to rob and drift. Most of these (as all of the queens) are bred and raised in the south, but you can find some northern breeders.

Cordovan

These are a subset of the Italians. In theory you could have a Cordovan in any breed, since it's technically just a color, but the ones for sale in North American that I've seen are all Italians. They are slightly more gentle, slightly more likely to rob and quite striking to look at. They have no black on them and look very yellow at first sight. Looking closely you see that where the Italians normally have black legs and head, they have a purplish brown legs and head.

Caucasian

Apis mellifera caucasica. They are a silver gray to dark brown color. They do propolis excessively. It is a sticky propolis rather than a hard propolis. They build up a little slower in the spring than the Italians. They are reputed to be more gentle than the Italians. Less prone to robbing. In theory they are less productive than Italians. I think on the average they are about the same productivity as the Italians, but since they rob less you get less of the really booming hives that have robbed out all their neighbors. They are fond of propolis and often coat everything in a sticky kind of propolis, like fly paper.

Carniolan

Apis mellifera carnica. These are darker brown to black. They fly in slightly cooler weather and in theory are better in northern climates. They are reputed by some to be less productive than Italians, but I have not had that experience. The ones I have had were very productive and very frugal for the winter. They winter in small clusters and shut down brood rearing when there are dearths.

Russian

I have heard several possiblities: Apis mellifera caucasica, Apis mellifera acervorum or Apis mellifera carpatica. Not sure of the exact variety here in the US. They came from the Primorksy region. They were used for breeding mite resistance because they were already surviving the mites. They are a bit defensive, but in odd ways. They tend to head butt a lot while not stinging any more. They are watchful guards, but not "runny" (tending to run around on the comb where you can't find the queen or work with them well). Swarminess and productivity are a bit more unpredictable. Traits are not well fixed. Frugality is similar to the Carniolans. They were brought to the USA by the USDA in June of 1997, studied on an island in Louisiana and then field testing in other states in 1999. They went on sale to the general public in 2000.

Africanized Honey Bees (AHB)

I have heard these called Apis mellifera scutelata But Scutelata are actually African bees from the Cape. They used to be called Adansonii, at least that's what Dr. Kerr, who bred them, thought they were. AHB are a mixture of African (Scutelata) and Italian bees. They were created in an attempt to increase production of bees. The USDA bred these at Baton Rouge from July 1942 until 1961. They shipped queens to the continental US at about 1500 queens a year from July 1949 until July of 1961. They were raised in testing labs in Laramie WY, Ontario Canada and Madison, WI. The Brazilians also were experimenting with them and the migration of those bees has been followed in the news for some time. They are extremely productive bees that are extremely defensive. If you have a hive hot enough that you think they are AHB you need to requeen them. Having angry bees where they might hurt people is irresponsible. You should try to requeen them so no one (including you) gets hurt.

 

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Why is Tupelo Honey so Difficult to get.
 

What is Tupelo Honey?

 Where Does it Come From?

 

The Tupelo Tree

This plant, which has about 10 separate species, has dark green, waxy, shiny leaves which glow red in the fall. It has white flowers and likes its roots to be in wet ground. Tupelo wood is great for carving because the sap wood is soft and able to hold finely-detailed carving. The best carving wood comes from the underwater base of the tree. In the U.S. this tree is cultivated specially for honey along the Gulf Coast. One particular area, the swamps along the Apalachicola River valley in Florida, produces the purest, most expensive Tupelo honey.

Split tupelo tree.  Photo by flickr.com/photos/lucianvenutian/

  

The Honey

The highest-grade certified tupelo honey is from the white tupelo flowers, which bloom for a short season of only two or three weeks – and that’s if there’s no bad weather.  The whole industry comprises a handful of producers who work their beehives in a small area of the swamps of Apalachicola River valley.  Producing this honey is laborious.  The hives themselves are kept on platforms or rafts along the swamp beds.  Then, just before the flowering season, they have to be emptied of honey reserves that would have been made from the flowers of other plants, and the honey has to be harvested as soon as the petals of the white tupelo flowers fall to the surface of the water, otherwise it would be mixed with honey from later flowering plants.
Pure tupelo honey has an unusually high fructose to glucose ratio, which makes it unique among honeys.  This property prevents it from crystallizing, unlike other honey.  So if you buy tupelo honey and it later crystallizes, this means it must have been made from other plants and not just the tupelo tree.
The high fructose content of this honey allows the body to absorb it more quickly initially, but to maintain that absorption over a sustained period, which makes it very useful for people who need a fast-acting but lasting energy source, such as athletes.

The real thing is a light amber color, and looks like it has a greenish tint in some lights.  Its scent is a little like that of a pear, and the taste is delicate, floral and slightly herbal, a real contrast to the heavyweight buckwheat honey.

 

Medical Benefits of Tupelo Honey

The unique thing about tupelo honey is its high fructose ratio.  This makes it faster to digest, and makes it suitable for some diabetics – but check with your physician first folks.  Raw, unprocessed, unheated tupelo honey has the same antibacterial and antioxidant properties as other quality honeys – the health benefits of honey are well researched.  But to get the benefits, you need to make sure that you are getting honey that has not been treated or heated in any way – basically you want it as good as when it comes from the beehive.  This is because the health-giving compounds are destroyed by heating.

 

Buying Tupelo Honey

Pure Tupelo flower honey is a very valuable commodity because of the labor-intensive production methods and the small geographical area that produces it.  Maybe for this reason, some less reputable producers will charge the same high pure-tupelo prices for products that contain honey from other plants.  So, be careful to choose a supplier with a solid reputation.  and remember, if you buy what is described as the real thing and it crystallizes, Houston, we have a problem!


 

Reprinted in part. The Complete process can be found at: Full Story

 

Why is Tupelo Honey so Difficult to get
 

The facts of why Tupelo honey is so difficult to get is as simple

as Market Conditions and Demand. 

Here are the facts . . .

 

The trees from which we get Tupelo honey are only in bloom 2 to 3 weeks a year.


The Tupelo tree grows in very few areas the Florida Panhandle, George and Mississippi.

 

The trees grow in wetland areas in several feet of water at the water's edge.

 

The Blossoms are very fragile and may be easily destroyed in wind and rain.

 

In 2015, as a result of weather conditions, production was off by 70%.

 

And Finally,  the increase demand for this golden nectar is unprecedented.

 

Have a great Day.

 

Sincerely,

Ginger & Charles

 


 

 

 

What’s wrong with Chinese honey?


 

Chinese honey has long had a poor reputation in the U.S., where — in 2001 — the Federal Trade Commission imposed stiff import tariffs or taxes to stop the Chinese from flooding the marketplace with dirt-cheap, heavily subsidized honey, which was forcing American beekeepers out of business.

To avoid the dumping tariffs, the Chinese quickly began transshipping honey to several other countries, then laundering it by switching the color of the shipping drums, the documents and labels to indicate a bogus but tariff-free country of origin for the honey.

Most U.S. honey buyers knew about the Chinese actions because of the sudden availability of lower cost honey, and little was said.

The FDA — either because of lack of interest or resources — devoted little effort to inspecting imported honey. Nevertheless, the agency had occasionally either been told of, or had stumbled upon, Chinese honey contaminated with chloramphenicol and other illegal animal antibiotics which are dangerous, even fatal, to a very small percentage of the population.

Mostly, the adulteration went undetected.

 

Why remove the pollen?
 

We can only assume to prevent the majority of the public from obtaining all the benefits found in raw honey. Removal of all pollen from honey “makes no sense” and is completely contrary to marketing the highest quality product possible, Mark Jensen, president of the American Honey Producers Association, told Food Safety News.

“I don’t know of any U.S. producer that would want to do that. Elimination of all pollen can only be achieved by ultra-filtering and this filtration process does nothing but cost money and diminish the quality of the honey,” Jensen said.

“In my judgment, it is pretty safe to assume that any ultra-filtered honey on store shelves is Chinese honey and it’s even safer to assume that it entered the country uninspected and in violation of federal law,” he added.

 

 

Reprinted in part.
For a link to the Full Story email us at:
Ginger & Charles

 


 

Many people have asked us why there is not a Nutritional Label on our Honey,
Eden's Nectar.

The answer; because we are a single source,
All Honey Product, no additional labeling is required.

Nutritional Labeling is required when other ingredients are mixed in the product.

 

Here's what the F.D.A. has to say about the subject.
 

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Food and Drug Administration

Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition

 

 

Labeling of Honey: Questions and Answers (Q&A)

 

1.    What is honey?

Reference materials in the public domain define honey as “a thick, sweet, syrupy substance that bees make as food from the nectar of flowers and store in honeycombs." FDA has concluded that this definition accurately reflects the common usage of the term “honey.”
 

2.    How shall we name Honey or Honey Product?

If a food contains only honey, the food must be named “honey,” which is its common or usual name. The common or usual name may also include the source of the honey, such as “Clover Honey,” on the label.  Because honey is a single ingredient food, you do not need to include an ingredient statement on the label. However, you must include all other mandatory information (e.g., net weight).

 

 3.    Do I have to declare the floral source of honey?

        No. You do not have to declare the floral source of honey on the label. However, you may label the    
        honey with the name of the plant or blossom.

 

       If a food consists of honey and a sweetener, such as sugar or corn syrup, can I label the food as only “honey”?

No, a product consisting of honey and a sweetener cannot be labeled with the common or usual name “honey.” The food is a blend or a mixture of honey and another sweetener. You must sufficiently describe the name of the food on the label to distinguish it from simply “honey”
 

Also we have been asked about the calorie count of our Honey.
 

The Answer: 60 calories per Tablespoon.

 

Reprinted in part from the FDA.gov entitled:

"Guidance for Industry:  Proper Labeling of Honey and Honey Products"

 

 


 

 

Honey Bees Are Important Pollinators
 

Pollination is the movement of male pollen to the female part of the flower (stigma), the first step in successful seed and fruit production by the plant. Self-pollination is when pollen is transferred from the anther to the stigma within a single plant. Cross-pollination is the transfer of pollen from one plant to the stigma of another plant. Once the plant has been pollinated, the male contribution fuses with the egg in the ovary, the process known as fertilization. After fertilization, the fruit and seeds develop and mature.

Although the male parts and female parts usually reside in a single flower, plants often have elaborate mechanisms to prevent self-fertilization. In some species the stigma of the flower ripens first, before the anthers are shedding pollen. Thus, it can be fertilized only by pollen brought from an older flower. In other plants, the opposite is true. The pollen is mature and shed before the stigma ripens. Other plants, such as squashes or watermelons, have sepa rate male and female flowers. A few plants, such as mulberry or olive, have separate male plants and female plants.

Some plants, for example grasses, produce light pollen grains that may be carried by the wind or water from plant to plant. Other plants need help from insects, birds, or bats for successful pollination. Without this assistance, fruit and/or seeds would not be formed. In fact, about a third of the food Americans eat is the direct result of pollination by in sects.

More than 100 agricultural crops in the United States are pollinated by bees. This means bees are important, if not essential, for the production of nearly $14.5 billion worth of agricultural crops produced  Examples of bee pollinated crops include watermelons, cantaloupe, citrus and apples.

Although some of these crops are pollinated by bee species other than honey bees, honey bees are the only ones that can be easily managed, moved around and are known to exploit a wide variety of crops.

While a worker bee is in a flower gathering nectar, pollen from the anther often sticks to her hairy body. Because the bee generally visits a number of the same type of flower in a patch, she will rub some of the pollen off onto the stigma of another flower and complete pollination. Some flowers such as orchids have elaborate mechanisms to make sure bees are dusted with pollen when they visit.

Part of the reason honey bees are so important as pollinators is that they actively seek out flowers with pollen, unlike pollinators such as bats and hummingbirds who are primarily interested in nectar. Pollen stored in the hive is used as a source of protein in feeding the developing larvae.

 

 

 

Portions Reprinted in part from several sources.
Need more information on this subject or any of the other topics we have posted here,
drop us an email to:  Ginger & Charles

 

 


 

 

 

 

Tests Show Most Store Honey

 Isn’t Honey

 

Ultra-filtering Removes Pollen, Hides Honey Origins


More than three-fourths of the honey sold in U.S. grocery stores isn’t exactly what the bees produce, according to testing done exclusively for Food Safety News.

The results show that the pollen frequently has been filtered out of products labeled “honey.”

The removal of these microscopic particles from deep within a flower would make the nectar flunk the quality standards set by most of the world’s food safety agencies.

The food safety divisions of the  World Health Organization, the European Commission and dozens of others also have ruled that without pollen there is no way to determine whether the honey came from legitimate and safe sources.
 

In the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration says that any product that’s been ultra-filtered and no longer contains pollen isn’t honey. However, the FDA isn’t checking honey sold here to see if it contains pollen.

Ultra filtering is a high-tech procedure where honey is heated, sometimes watered down and then forced at high pressure through extremely small filters to remove pollen, which is the only foolproof sign identifying the source of the honey. It is a spin-off of a technique refined by the Chinese, who have illegally dumped tons of their honey – some containing illegal antibiotics – on the U.S. market for years.

Food Safety News decided to test honey sold in various outlets after its earlier investigation found U.S. groceries flooded with Indian honey banned in Europe as unsafe because of contamination with antibiotics, heavy metal and a total lack of pollen which prevented tracking its origin.

Food Safety News purchased more than 60 jars, jugs and plastic bears of honey in 10 states and the District of Columbia.

The contents were analyzed for pollen by Vaughn Bryant, a professor at Texas A&M University and one of the nation’s premier melissopalynologists, or investigators of pollen in honey.

Bryant, who is director of the Palynology Research Laboratory, found that among the containers of honey provided by Food Safety News:

•76 percent of samples bought at groceries had all the pollen removed, These were stores like TOP Food, Safeway, Giant Eagle, QFC, Kroger, Metro Market, Harris Teeter, A&P, Stop & Shop and King Soopers.

•100 percent of the honey sampled from drugstores like Walgreens, Rite-Aid and CVS Pharmacy had no pollen.

•77 percent of the honey sampled from big box stores like Costco, Sam’s Club, Walmart, Target and H-E-B had the pollen filtered out.

•100 percent of the honey packaged in the small individual service portions from Smucker, McDonald’s and KFC had the pollen removed.

 

Reprinted in part.  For The complete Report Including a List of the honeys tested, follow the link provided and search "Tests Show Most Store Honey Isn’t Honey"

Read
More . . . Click

 


 

 

Important Nutritional Facts About Honey

Calories

Each tablespoon of honey contains about 60 to 64 calories. Honey does not
 contain any sodium. It doesn't have any 
cholesterol and also has no fat content.

The average composition of honey is about 80% carbohydrates, 18% water and 2% amino acids, vitamins, and minerals.

Carbohydrates

Honey is loaded with natural sugar, mostly fructose and glucose, which means it is high in carbohydrates.

There are 17 grams of carbohydrates in each tablespoon of honey, and 16 are from sugar.

Research studies have shown that honey is a very effective carbohydrate, especially for athletes.

Vitamins And Minerals

The most common nutrients found in honey are Vitamin B6, niacin, thiamine, pantothenic acid, and riboflavin.

Amounts will vary according to the floral type of the honey.

Honey also contains minerals such as copper, calcium, iron, manganese, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus, sodium, and zinc.

Antioxidants

This nutritious sweetener also has various phenolic acids and flavoniods which are certain types of antioxidants.

These antioxidants help to eliminate free radicals which often play a role in causing many serious diseases.

Generally, the darker honeys, will have higher antioxidant levels compared to lighter colored honeys.

Fructose, Glucose, Maltose, Sucrose and Water Content

Honey's composition is about 38.5% fructose and 31% of glucose.

It also contains maltose, about 7.1% and sucrose, about 1.3%. Its water is content is roughly 17%.

Glycemic Index

It can range from 31 to 78, based upon what variety it is.

Acid Content

The normal pH of honey is usually around 3.9, but it can vary from 3.4 to 6.

Honey contains many different types of acids, both amino and organic.

Of course, the amounts and types will differ substantially, depending on the honey variety.

These kinds of acids can be aromatic or non-aromatic (aliphatic).

The aliphatic acids make a difference in the honey's flavor because it interacts with flavors of the other ingredients.

Amino Acids and Enzymes

Enzymes are proteins and they are created from amino acids.

Enzymes have an important function in honey, as well as contribute to its overall properties.

Enzymes in honey turn it into a unique food, much more complex when compared to other sweeteners. Honey has eighteen amino acids.

The content is very minimal, about 0.05-0.1% of its overall composition. Proline is the main amino acid that is found in honey.

Organic acids consist of the majority of the acids that are in honey, comprising about 0.17-1.17%. The most prevalent organic acid is gluconic acid.

Guconic acid is made by the glucose oxidase enzyme.

Other organic acids found in very small quantities include succinic, acetic, butyric, capronic, malic, formic, lactic, citric, propionic, pyroglutamic, valeric, and palmitic.


Honey normally contains very small amounts of different kinds of enzymes. Besides gluconic acid, honey also contains diastase (amylase), and invertase (glucosidase).

Phosphatase and catalase can also be found in honey. Honey's enzyme content will vary based on its floral source and location.

Honey is definitely more than just a simple sugar because it's rich in vitamins, minerals and other nutrients.

This healthy natural sweetener, offers many nutritional benefits without the man-made chemicals that comprise other types of sweeteners.

Although, nutrition facts can vary slightly based on the floral variety, they usually are very similar. 

Honey vs Sugar - Honey is considered by many to be the world's oldest sweetener. The health benefits of honey have been noted by many people over the centuries. Even the ancient philosopher, Aristotle, wrote about the many nutritional and medicinal benefits of honey. Most people use sweeteners everyday so it's important to learn how honey differs from sugar.

Honeybee's Diet - Honey bees form a highly organized society and for thousands of years they have been of great interest to humans. According to Great Plains Nature Center, humans have written about honey bees more than any other species of insects, which signals that they really have something special that's worth cherishing. 

Raw Honey - Raw honey is simply honey that hasn't been heated, processed or pasteurized at all. The real differences between pasteurized honey and raw honey are very important.

 

 


 

 

What Makes Honey Thick or Runny?

Do YOU Know?

 

Of Course, it Viscosity

Viscosity for liquids, it corresponds to the informal concept of "thickness"; for example, honey has a much higher viscosity than water.

Viscosity is a property arising from collisions between neighboring particles in a fluid that are moving at different velocities. When the fluid is forced through a tube, the particles which compose the fluid generally move more quickly near the tube's axis and more slowly near its walls; therefore some stress (such as a pressure difference between the two ends of the tube) is needed to overcome the friction between particle layers to keep the fluid moving. For a given velocity pattern, the stress required is proportional to the fluid's viscosity.

 

Viscosity Tables


Viscosity is the measurement of a fluid's internal resistance to flow. This is typically designated in units of centipoise or poise but can be expressed in other acceptable measurements as well. Some conversion factors are as follows:

100 Centipoise = 1 Poise
1 Centipoise = 1 mPa s (Millipascal Second)
1 Poise = 0.1 Pa s (Pascal Second)
Centipoise = Centistoke x Specific Gravity



Many of people don't have a clue.   The viscosity (or "flow rate") of honey is dependent on a number of factors.

RAW HONEY is no thicker than honey that has been processed. True, when microwaved or heated on a stove, the hot honey will be thin and flow rapidly WHILE HOT.......but that same honey will return to its original thickness when cooled. So don't look to the viscosity to determine whether or not your honey is raw, because "raw"-ness does not make honey thick!!

Then what DOES determine the relative runny-ness  viscosity of your honey?

It's the floral sources --the nectar, the weather, and the temperature of the honey itself.

Palm trees contribute a nectar that makes honey thin, whereas orange blossom's nectar creates a slightly thicker honey.

We live in Florida where humidity and temperatures are high most of the year. We are surrounded by palm trees, and there's lots of rain (except in Spring). So our honey tends to be rather liquid. Except in Winter!!! 


Honey is hydroscopic. That means that it absorbs humidity from the air. This will also influence your honey's flow rate.

Honey left in a hot car in your grocery bag will be thinner than that same jar stored in an air conditioned kitchen.

And DON'T store your honey in the refrigerator.

Have A question? email us. We will look into it and possibly answer you in this forum.

 

 


 

 

Nature’s Energy Food
 

 

Honey… Natural Energy

Honey is a source of carbohydrates, providing 17 grams per tablespoon, which makes it ideal for your working muscles since carbohydrates are the primary fuel the body uses for energy. Carbohydrates are necessary in the diet to help maintain muscle glycogen, also known as stored carbohydrates, which are the most important fuel source for athletes to help them keep going.

Whether you’re looking for an energy boost or just a sweet reward after a long workout, honey is a quick, easy, and delicious all-natural energy source!

Honey as an Athletic Aid

Pre-exercise: For years, sports nutritionists have recommended eating carbohydrates before an athletic activity for an added energy boost.  As with many carbohydrates, pure honey may be an effective form to ingest just prior to exercise. When honey is eaten before a workout or athletic activity, it is released into the system at a steady rate throughout the event.

During Exercise: Consuming carbohydrates, such as honey, during a workout helps your muscles stay nourished longer and delays fatigue, versus not using any aid or supplement. Next time you reach for a simple bottle of water, add some honey to it – it might give you that much-needed athletic boost!

Post-exercise: An optimal recovery plan is essential for any athlete. Research shows that ingesting a combination of carbohydrates and protein immediately following exercise (within 30 minutes) is ideal to refuel and decrease delayed-onset muscle soreness. Therefore, honey is a great source of carbohydrate to combine with post-workout protein supplements.  In addition to promoting muscle recuperation and glycogen restoration, carb-protein combinations sustain favorable blood sugar concentrations after training.

Usage Tips

When planning your athletic training program, remember that honey is a source of carbohydrates, providing 17 grams at just 64 calories per tablespoon. Combining honey with fruits, vegetables, lean meats, whole grains and other healthful foods can add to your total nutrition and give you a great natural energy boost. Try these tips to fuel your diet with the sweet goodness of honey!

  • Staying hydrated is one of the most important tools for an athlete. Simply add honey to your bottle of water for an energy boost during your next workout.
  • Snacks are a great way to add extra fruits and vegetables to your diet. Try mixing peanut butter and honey, or honey and light cream cheese, as a dip for fresh fruits or vegetables.
  • Peanut butter and honey sandwiches on whole wheat bread are a great, high-energy snack to provide a good combination of carbohydrates, protein and fat.
  • Since honey is a convenient, portable source of energy, take it with you for tournaments and long periods of activity to help sustain your energy levels.

 

Special Offer Just-For-You  Click

 

 


Reprinted in part.  Source: The National Honey Board.

 


Liquid Gold:
7 Health Benefits Of Honey
That Could Heal Your
Whole Body

 

Honey contains a treasure chest of hidden nutritional and medicinal value for centuries. The sweet golden liquid from the beehive is a popular kitchen staple loaded with antibacterial and antifungal properties that has been used since the early days of Egyptian tombs.

 

Honey’s scientific super powers contribute to its vastly touted health benefits for the whole body. The healthy natural sweetener offers many nutritional benefits depending on its variety. A tablespoon of raw honey contains 64 calories, is fat-free, cholesterol-free, and sodium-free, says the National Honey Board. Its composition is roughly 80 percent carbohydrates, 18 percent water, and two percent vitamins, minerals, and amino acids.

 

HONEY BACKGROUND

Naturally heal your body back to health with the benefits of honey, from treating a pesky cold to itchy dandruff. Typically, honey is sweet but can be cruel to infants. Spores of Clostridium botulinum bacteria — found in dirt and dust, which can contaminate honey — may lead to infant botulism and produce a toxin inside the body that can cause muscle weakness and breathing problems. The Mayo Clinic recommends waiting until after 12 months of age to give infants honey; consumption is safe for older adults and kids, since they have a mature digestive system that can handle the spores.

 

1. ALLEVIATES ALLERGIES

Honey’s anti-inflammatory effects and ability to soothe coughs has led to the belief it can also reduce seasonal allergy symptoms. Although there are no clinical studies proving its efficacy, Dr. Matthew Brennecke, a board certified naturopathic doctor practicing at the Rocky Mountain Wellness Center in Fort Collins, Colo., told Medical Daily in an email, "A common theory is that honey acts like a natural vaccine." It contains small amounts of pollen, which if the body is exposed to small amounts of it, it can trigger an immune response that produces antibodies to the pollen. "After repeated exposure, you should build up these antibodies and the body should become accustomed to their presence so that less histamine is released, resulting in a lesser allergic response."

 

2. ALL-NATURAL ENERGY DRINK

Honey is an excellent source of all-natural energy at just 17 grams of carbohydrates per tablespoon. This natural unprocessed sugar — fructose and glucose — directly enter the bloodstream and can deliver a quick boost of energy. The rise in blood sugar acts as a short-term energy source for your workout, especially in longer endurance exercises.

 

3. BOOSTS MEMORY

Honey’s ability to help the body absorb calcium, according to Brennecke, helps aid brain health. The brain needs calcium in order to process thought and make decisions. “As our populations continue to get older and older, the likelihood of dementia setting in because of poor intake of vitamins and minerals continues to get higher and higher,” he said.

 

4. COUGH SUPPRESSANT

Honey can be the all-natural cure when it comes to pesky colds. A persistent cough that won’t go away can easily be remedied with two teaspoons of honey, according to a 2012 study published in the journal Pediatrics. Children between the ages of 1 and 5 with nighttime cough due to colds coughed less frequently when they received two teaspoons of honey 30 minutes before bed.

The golden liquid’s thick consistency helps coat the throat while the sweet taste is believed to trigger nerve endings that protect the throat from incessant coughing. Honey is believed to be as effective as the common cough suppressant ingredient dextromethorphan. It can be used in treating upper respiratory tract infections.

 

5. SLEEP AID

 Honey can be a health aid for sleepless nights. Similar to sugar, honey can cause a rise in insulin and release serotonin — a neurotransmitter that improves mood and happiness. “The body converts serotonin into melatonin, a chemical compound that regulates the length and the quality of sleep,” Rene Ficek, registered dietitian and lead dietitian nutritionist at Seattle Sutton's Healthy Eating in Chicago, Ill., told Medical Daily in an email.

Moreover, honey also contains several amino acids, including tryptophan that is commonly associated with turkey. Honey’s steady rise in insulin, according to Brennecke, causes the tryptophan in honey to enter the brain, where it’s then converted into serotonin and then into melatonin, which is a sleep aid. This hormone is responsible for regulating sleep and wake cycles.

 

6. TREATS DANDRUFF

Honey can bring temporary relief to the scalp by targeting dandruff. A 2001 study published in the European Journal of Medical Research found applying honey diluted with 10 percent warm water to problem areas and leaving it on for three hours before rinsing led to itch relief and no scaling within a week. Skin lesions healed within two weeks and patients even showed an improvement in hair loss. The patients did not relapse even after six months of use.

Thanks to honey's antibacterial and antifungal properties, it can also treat seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff, which are often caused by an overgrowth of fungus. Moreover, “honey also has anti-inflammatory properties, which address the redness and itching on the scalp,” Brennecke said.

 

7. TREATS WOUNDS AND BURNS

Honey is a natural antibiotic that can act both internally and externally. It can be used as a conventional treatment for wounds and burns by disinfecting wounds and sores from major species of bacteria such as methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A 2005 study published in the British Journal of Surgery found all but one of patients who suffered from wounds and leg ulcers showed remarkable improvement after applying a topical application of honey.

Honey has been utilized for its medicinal properties for over 2,000 years and continues its legacy as a multipurpose health aid.

 

 

 


 

 


Cinnamon & Honey's


Healing Properties

 

 

Honey will crystallize if it is left in a cool dark place for the long time, but do not mistake this crystallization for it turning into sugar. Honey never will become sugar. If it does crystallize, simply loosen the lid and let the honey jar sit in boiled water, as this will allow the honey to re-liquefy naturally.

Today's science says that even though honey is sweet and when taken in the right dosage as a "medicine", it will not and does not harm even diabetics.

Ok, all that being said, let's get to healing qualities of the sulfur-based cinnamon/honey combination as researched by Western scientists, who by the way, are clueless about the sulfur effectiveness or the fact that cinnamon and honey are sulfur based:

HEART DISEASE
Make a paste of honey and cinnamon powder and apply it on bread instead of jelly and jam and eat it regularly for breakfast. It reduces the cholesterol in the arteries and could prevent a heart attack. If someone already had a heart attack and you take this combination, your next heart attack may never happen. The regular use of this combination relieves loss of breath and strengthens the heartbeat. In America and Canada, various nursing homes have treated patients successfully and have found that as one ages, the arteries and veins lose their flexibility and get clogged; the cinnamon and honey combination revitalizes the arteries and veins.

ARTHRITIS
Arthritis patients should take, twice a day (morning and night), a cup of hot water with two tablespoons of honey and one teaspoon of cinnamon powder. When taken regularly, even chronic arthritis can be cured. In a research project conducted at Copenhagen University, it was found that when doctors treated their patients with a mixture of one tablespoon of honey and a half-teaspoon of cinnamon powder before breakfast, they found that within a week 73 out of the 200 tested were totally relieved of pain. Within a month, most all of the people who had trouble walking or moving around because of their arthritis could walk without pain.

BLADDER INFECTIONS
Take two tablespoons of cinnamon powder and one teaspoon of honey in a glass of lukewarm water and drink it. It will destroy the germs in the bladder.

CHOLESTEROL
Two tablespoons of honey and three teaspoons of cinnamon powder mixed in 16 ounces of water were found to reduce the level of cholesterol in the blood by 10 percent within two hours. As mentioned for arthritic patients, when taken three times a day, chronic cholesterol is cured. The scientists also found that pure honey taken with food on a daily basis relieves complaints of cholesterol.

COLDS
Those suffering from common or severe colds should take one tablespoon of lukewarm honey with one quarter of a spoonful for cinnamon powder daily for three days as this procedure will cure most chronic coughs, colds, and will clear the sinuses.

UPSET STOMACH
Honey taken with cinnamon powder cures stomach ache and also clears stomach ulcers for its roots.

GAS
According to the studies done in India and Japan, it is revealed that when honey is taken with cinnamon powder the stomach is relieved of gas.

IMMUNE SYSTEM
Daily use of honey and cinnamon powder strengthens the immune system and protects the body from bacterial and viral attacks. The scientists have found that honey has various vitamins and iron in larger amounts. Constant use of honey strengthens the white blood corpuscles, where the DNA is contained, to fight bacterial and viral diseases.

INDIGESTION
Cinnamon powder sprinkled on two tablespoons of honey taken before food is eaten relieves acidity and aids in the digestion of the heaviest of meals.

INFLUENZA
A scientist in Spain has proved that honey contains a natural "ingredient", which kills the flu germs and will prevent the person from getting the flu. (I ain't no learned scientist but I do know that the natural "ingredient" is sulfur and that those that take the organic sulfur crystals never get the flu).

LONGEVITY
Tea made with honey and cinnamon powder, when taken regularly, arrests the ravages of old age. Use four teaspoons of honey, one teaspoon of cinnamon powder, and three cups of boiling water to make the tea. Drink one quarter of a cup three to four times a day. It keeps the skin fresh and soft and delays aging. Life spans increase and even those in their 90s plus, will have the energy of someone half their age. Allow me to inject some humor here: I play in two senior softball leagues. One of the guys, who is 87 asks me if the sulfur crystals are good for erectile dysfunction. I tell him that they are but they must be taken twice a day. About two weeks later I ask him if he is taking the crystals. He says he is. I then ask him if he is taking them twice a day. He says he is taking them once a day. I reminded him that their utmost effectiveness is by taking them twice a day. He says that he knows that but his wife can't handle it when he takes them twice a day.

RASPY OR SORE THROAT
When the throat has a tickle or is raspy, take one tablespoon of honey and sip it until it is finished. Repeat this every three hours until the throat is without symptoms.
PIMPLES
Three tablespoons of honey and one teaspoon of cinnamon power paste. Apply this paste on the pimples before sleeping and wash it off the next morning with warm water. When done for two weeks, it removes pimples from the root (of course, eliminating sugar from the diet couldn't hurt).


SKIN INFECTIONS
Applying honey and cinnamon powder in equal parts to cure eczema, ringworm and all types of skin infections.

WEIGHT LOSS
In the morning and one half hour before breakfast and on an empty stomach, and at night before sleeping, drink honey and cinnamon powder boiled in one cup of water. When taken regularly, it reduces the weight of even the most obese person. Also, drinking this mixture regularly does not allow the fat to accumulate in the body even though the person may eat a high calorie diet.

CANCER
Recent research in Japan and Australia has revealed that advanced cancer of the stomach and bones have been cured successfully. Patients suffering from these kinds of cancer should take one tablespoon of honey with one teaspoon of cinnamon power three times a day for one month.

FATIGUE
Recent studies have shown that the sugar content of honey is more helpful rather than being detrimental to the strength of the body. Senior citizens who take honey and cinnamon powder in equal parts are more alert and flexible. A Dr. Milton, who apparently does not have a first name, has done research showing that a half tablespoon of honey taken in a glass of water and sprinkled with cinnamon powder, even when the vitality of the body starts to decrease, when taken daily after brushing and in the afternoon at about 3:00 P.M., the vitality of the body increases within a week.

BAD BREATH
Gargling with one teaspoon of honey and cinnamon powder mixed in hot water first thing in the morning will keep the breath fresh all day.

HEARING LOSS
Allegedly, daily morning and night honey and cinnamon powder, taken in equal parts restores hearing.

TOOTHACHE
Make a paste of one teaspoon of cinnamon powder and five teaspoons of honey and apply it to the aching tooth three times a day until the ache is gone.

HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE
High blood pressure and its accompanying symptoms of chest pain and dizziness disappeared in many patients' just weeks after an Italian researcher gave them regular doses of honey and cinnamon. Blood pressure improved and all 137 subjects felt better after a few weeks.



 

Reprinted in part. The Complete process can be found at: Full Story

 


 

 

The Science Behind Honey’s Eternal

 

Shelf Life.

A slew of factors—its acidity, its lack of water and the presence of hydrogen peroxide—work in perfect harmony, allowing the sticky treat to last forever.

 

Modern archeologists, excavating ancient Egyptian tombs, have often found something unexpected amongst the tombs’ artifacts: pots of honey, thousands of years old, and yet still preserved. Through millennia, the archeologists discover, the food remains unspoiled, an unmistakable testament to the eternal shelf-life of honey.
 

 

The first comes from the chemical make-up of honey itself. Honey is, first and foremost, a sugar. Sugars are hygroscopic, a term that means they contain very little water in their natural state but can readily suck in moisture if left unsealed. As Amina Harris, executive director of the Honey and Pollination Center at the Robert Mondavi Institute at Univeristy of California, Davis explains, “Honey in its natural form is very low moisture. Very few bacteria or microorganisms can survive in an environment like that, they just die. They’re smothered by it, essentially.” What Harris points out represents an important feature of honey’s longevity: for honey to spoil, there needs to be something inside of it that can spoil. With such an inhospitable environment, organisms can’t survive long enough within the jar of honey to have the chance to spoil.

 

Honey is also naturally extremely acidic. “It has a pH that falls between 3 and 4.5, approximately, and that acid will kill off almost anything that wants to grow there,” Harris explains. So bacteria and spoil-ready organisms must look elsewhere for a home–the life expectancy inside of honey is just too low.

 

Honey has been used for centuries as a medicinal remedy. Because it’s so thick, rejects any kind of growth and contains hydrogen peroxide, it creates the perfect barrier against infection for wounds. The earliest recorded use of honey for medicinal purposes comes from Sumerian clay tablets, which state that honey was used in 30 percent of prescriptions. The ancient Egyptians used medicinal honey regularly, making ointments to treat skin and eye diseases. “Honey was used to cover a wound or a burn or a slash, or something like that, because nothing could grow on it – so it was a natural bandage,” Harris explains.

 

If you buy your honey from the supermarket, that little plastic bottle of golden nectar has been heated, strained and processed so that it contains zero particulates, meaning that there’s nothing in the liquid for molecules to crystallize on, and your supermarket honey will look the same for almost forever. If you buy your honey from a small-scale vendor, however, certain particulates might remain, from pollen to enzymes. With these particulates, the honey might crystallize, but don’t worry–if it’s sealed, it’s not spoiled and won’t be for quite some time.

 

So if you’re interested in keeping honey for hundreds of years, do what the bees do and keep it sealed–a hard thing to do with this delicious treat!

 

Reprinted in part. The Complete process can be found at: Full Story


 

 

If Your Honey is Raw, why is it not solid?

&

“What is the difference between Raw Honey 

and liquid Honey
?"

 

We keep getting asked the same question about honey. "If it's raw, why isn't it solid?" Many  health shows and videos show raw honey in a solid crystallized state. Some websites will also post pictures of liquid honey next to crystallized honey and say the liquid honey is fake.  This is not accurate.

 

Another frequently asked question is phrased this way: “what is the difference between raw honey and liquid honey.Some think that raw honey means the honey is crystallizednot true!

 

Liquid Honey is the way honey comes from the hive. Extracting honey from honey comb yields a wonderful golden liquid that goes right in the jar. Fresh raw honey will be liquid since it was just extracted from the hives. In fact, all honey is liquid when it is harvested or taken from the hives. As time passes, honey will start to crystallize, and raw honey will crystallize faster than commercially packed honey.

 

Crystallized honey or Creamed Honey is simply the result of the process honey under goes when changing from a liquid to a solid. Sort of like water to ice. Heating just delays the crystallization process, so crystallized honey may have been heated in the past, you need to ask the beekeeper if you are looking for unheated honey.

 

It is normal for raw honey to crystallize. How fast this happens depends on several factors:
The source of honey. Honey is composed of multiple sugars derived from the flowers the bees are feeding on, so the exact composition will vary.  The biggest factor contributing to when honey crystallize, is the ratio between the differing types of sugars contained in the honey which therefore controls the length of time the honey takes to crystallize.

 

 

Portions Reprinted in part from several sources.
Need more information on this subject or any of the other topics we have posted here,
drop us an email to:  Ginger & Charles

 

 



 

Why is Tupelo Honey so Difficult to get.
 

What is Tupelo Honey?

 Where Does it Come From?

 

The Tupelo Tree

This plant, which has about 10 separate species, has dark green, waxy, shiny leaves which glow red in the fall. It has white flowers and likes its roots to be in wet ground. Tupelo wood is great for carving because the sap wood is soft and able to hold finely-detailed carving. The best carving wood comes from the underwater base of the tree. In the U.S. this tree is cultivated specially for honey along the Gulf Coast. One particular area, the swamps along the Apalachicola River valley in Florida, produces the purest, most expensive Tupelo honey.

Split tupelo tree.  Photo by flickr.com/photos/lucianvenutian/

  

The Honey

The highest-grade certified tupelo honey is from the white tupelo flowers, which bloom for a short season of only two or three weeks – and that’s if there’s no bad weather.  The whole industry comprises a handful of producers who work their beehives in a small area of the swamps of Apalachicola River valley.  Producing this honey is laborious.  The hives themselves are kept on platforms or rafts along the swamp beds.  Then, just before the flowering season, they have to be emptied of honey reserves that would have been made from the flowers of other plants, and the honey has to be harvested as soon as the petals of the white tupelo flowers fall to the surface of the water, otherwise it would be mixed with honey from later flowering plants.
Pure tupelo honey has an unusually high fructose to glucose ratio, which makes it unique among honeys.  This property prevents it from crystallizing, unlike other honey.  So if you buy tupelo honey and it later crystallizes, this means it must have been made from other plants and not just the tupelo tree.
The high fructose content of this honey allows the body to absorb it more quickly initially, but to maintain that absorption over a sustained period, which makes it very useful for people who need a fast-acting but lasting energy source, such as athletes.

The real thing is a light amber color, and looks like it has a greenish tint in some lights.  Its scent is a little like that of a pear, and the taste is delicate, floral and slightly herbal, a real contrast to the heavyweight buckwheat honey.

 

Medical Benefits of Tupelo Honey

The unique thing about tupelo honey is its high fructose ratio.  This makes it faster to digest, and makes it suitable for some diabetics – but check with your physician first folks.  Raw, unprocessed, unheated tupelo honey has the same antibacterial and antioxidant properties as other quality honeys – the health benefits of honey are well researched.  But to get the benefits, you need to make sure that you are getting honey that has not been treated or heated in any way – basically you want it as good as when it comes from the beehive.  This is because the health-giving compounds are destroyed by heating.

 

Buying Tupelo Honey

Pure Tupelo flower honey is a very valuable commodity because of the labor-intensive production methods and the small geographical area that produces it.  Maybe for this reason, some less reputable producers will charge the same high pure-tupelo prices for products that contain honey from other plants.  So, be careful to choose a supplier with a solid reputation.  and remember, if you buy what is described as the real thing and it crystallizes, Houston, we have a problem!


 

Reprinted in part. The Complete process can be found at: Full Story

 

Why is Tupelo Honey so Difficult to get
 

The facts of why Tupelo honey is so difficult to get is as simple

as Market Conditions and Demand. 

Here are the facts . . .

 

The trees from which we get Tupelo honey are only in bloom 2 to 3 weeks a year.


The Tupelo tree grows in very few areas the Florida Panhandle, George and Mississippi.

 

The trees grow in wetland areas in several feet of water at the water's edge.

 

The Blossoms are very fragile and may be easily destroyed in wind and rain.

 

In 2015, as a result of weather conditions, production was off by 70%.

 

And Finally,  the increase demand for this golden nectar is unprecedented.

 

Have a great Day.

 

Sincerely,

Ginger & Charles

 

 


 

 

 

Picture of Ingredients & Materials

Methods for Infusing Honey

(When infusing "Raw Honey" the Cold Slow Method is preferable)

 

Easy tutorial for infusing your own honey at home in two different ways.

Honey is a delicious and beneficial natural sweetener that can be added to enhance a wide variety of foods and dishes. It's mild flavor profile can also easily take on the delightful and welcome flavor of most herbs, spices, flowers, and fruit peels through the process of infusion. Infused honey also makes a great homemade gift for the friends and families in your life.

This Instructable will detail two ways to infuse your honey. The first technique is a "fast" infusion method utilizing heat. The second method is a "slow" infusion that uses time instead of heat. Each has it's own benefits, use whichever you feel more comfortable with. No matter which method you use, steps 1-5 are the same and should be followed for both fast and slow methods.

 

Step 1: Ingredients & Materials

 

You’ll need the following:

•            Honey

•            Herbs and Spices to Flavor*

•            Tea Bags

•            Honey Dipper**

•            Double Boiler

•            Glass Jars with Lids

•            Zester/Grater

•            Knife

•            Cutting Board

•            Measuring Cups

*NOTE: You can choose any herbs and spices that you’d like to infuse your honey with. For this Instructable I infused three different honey batches with Vanilla & Orange, Rosemary, and Hot Chili. Other combinations could include: Green Tea, Thyme, Lemon Zest, Sage, Allspice, Mint, Ginger, or any combination of the above. As always, get created. I would avoid fruit and stick to fruit zest if possible.



**OPTIONAL

Step 2: Sterilize Your Jars

 

Fill a large pot with water. Place your jars and their lids inside the pot, submerging them in the water. Bring to a boil and continue to boil for 10 minutes. This will clean and sterilize your jars before you put your infused honey in them, reducing the risk of bacteria. Allow your jars to cool while you start to infuse your honey.

 

Step 3: Wash

  

Wash any herbs or fruit you may be using under a steady stream of cold water. Allow your washed items to dry. This will prevent bacteria from getting into your new batch of honey. You'll also want to make sure that your herbs and/or fruit are completely dry before adding them to the honey, you don't want any water in your finished honey.

 

 

Step 4: Prepare & Chop

 

After your herbs or fruit have dried you can prepare them for infusion. I like to chop herbs and/or muddle my spices to release more of the aromatic flavors. You can use whole herb leaves, but you will need more of them for the infusion.

You can adapt the strength of the flavor in your infusion to your own personal preference. Add more spices/herbs for a stronger flavor and less of each for a milder flavor. Get creative! I used the following amounts for my infusions:

Vanilla & Orange Honey:

•            1/2 Cup of Grade A Honey

•            Zest from 1/2 of a Large Organic Navel Orange

•            1/2 Chopped Vanilla Bean

Rosemary Honey:

•            1/2 Cup of Grade A Honey

•            2 Rosemary Sprigs Chopped (each sprig was roughly 4")

Hot Pepper Honey:

•            1/2 Cup of Grade A Honey

•            1 Thai Chili Chopped (can be substituted with other peppers)
 

 

Step 5: Tea Bags

 

You can steep your honey with loose herbs and spices but then you will have to strain your honey mixture at the end, or be okay with solids in your finished product. Instead, I prefer to place all of my herbs and spices for the infusion in a loose leaf tea bag. This will allow for the honey to soak in the aromatic flavors you've chosen, but also allow for easy removal when you are done.

For this step, place your prepared (chopped, muddled, or zested) herbs and spices in an empty loose leaf tea bag and twist the top to help the bag remained closed.



Step 6: Fast Infusion

 

This is technique #1: The Fast Infusion. This technique utilizes heat to help the honey quickly absorb the flavor profile of the herbs/spices that you are using to infuse with. It is beneficial in that it can be used in a pinch to create a flavored honey for a cheese plate or last minute dessert. It does however heat the honey, which can eliminate some of honey's natural benefits. Nonetheless, it's delicious and works wonderfully.

1.           Set up your double broiler.

2.           Pour ½ cup of Honey into your double broiler.

3.           Add your tea bag of herbs and spices.

4.           Slowly heat your honey until it reaches a temperature of 185F (85C). Keep your honey mixture
              steeping at 185F for ten minutes.

5.           Remove from heat and allow your honey to cool for 10 minutes.

6.           Remove your tea bag from the honey.

7.           Gently and carefully pour your honey into your sterilized jars.

8.           Screw on the lid. You’re done!

 

Step 7: Slow Infusion

 

This is method #2: The Slow Infusion. This particular infusion will take up to 2 weeks for your honey to absorb the flavor profiles of the herbs and spices you are infusing.

1.           Untwist your tea bag and tie a knot in it instead to secure your infusion spices and herbs.

2.           Place your prepared tea bags into one of your sterilized jars.

3.           Pour honey over the top of the tea bag, filling the jar.

4.           Screw on your jar lid tightly.

5.           Let your jar of honey sit for up to 2 weeks to absorb the flavors.

6.           Invert your honey jar whenever your tea bag floats to the surface to keep your herbs and spices   
              submerged and to mix the honey ever so slightly.

After two weeks your honey should be infused to it's maximum intensity. Open your jar and remove your
tea bag. Replace your jar lid, screwing it on tightly. You're done!

 

Step 8: Enjoy
 

You’re done! Use your newly infused honey anywhere you’d regularly use honey. It is a wonderful and flavorful addition to tea, baked goods, or tagines. My new personal favorite use for my honey is to lightly drizzle it over vanilla ice cream.

Your newly infused honey also makes a great gift. Simply label it or tie a ribbon around it and proudly gift it to friends and family.

 

Reprinted in part. The Complete process can be found at: Full Story


 

 

 

The Disturbing Link Between High
 
Fructose Corn Syrup and Honey

 

High fructose corn syrup, that sweet over-produced commodity of agribusinesses everywhere, has been linked in two miserable ways to bees and honey. The first discovery was made almost two years ago, and the second only 2 months ago. First, most of the “honey” available for purchase in supermarkets is not really honey, but instead an ultra-filtered impostor often produced in China, and frequently contains high fructose corn syrup. Secondly, honey-producing bees in their hives are being fed high fructose corn syrup
instead of their own honey, and new research has linked this practice to colony collapse disorder.

I recently learned that much of the honey we are buying is diluted with HFC, but thispractice was exposed back in 2011. According to research, up to 75% of the honey purchased in the US is not technically honey, since it contains no trace of pollen. Ultrafiltration has been used to purge the honey of all pollen, thereby making it impossible to determine the source of the honey. According to an article published
by 
Food Safety News:

It seems one reason to ultrafilter honey may be extending shelf life and providing crystal clear honey. But skeptics and those in the industry state the main reason to do this is to obscure the origin of the honey, which may be India, China, or Brazil, and may contain prohibited levels of pesticides, heavy metals, antibiotics, and dilutions with cheap high fructose corn syrup.

While the HFC fed to bees seems to be a major part of the problem, one cannot ignore the other scientific studies that implicate Bayer’s neonicotinoid pesticides, and the genetically-modified crops engineered by Monsanto that are treated
with the pesticide.

 

Thank you
 

Reprint in part from: KevinMD.com


 

 

4 Raw Honey Secrets That Will Leave

 Your Skin, Hair, And Nails Beautiful

 

There’s no denying it: honey is delicious. It’s sweet, syrupy and evokes a sense of indulgence and homeliness. In recent years, raw honey has received a big thumbs-up from the alternative health community as a “healthier” sweetener. The active enzymes contained within honey help our bodies more easily digest the sugars, and even help to lower cholesterol and aid in weight loss.

 

But while you may be familiar with all this, you’ll probably be pleasantly surprised to learn that honey can work wonders for your hair, skin and nails. In the same way that honey nurtures your body and provides vital nutrients and antioxidants, it also nourishes your largest organ (your skin, in case you were wondering!), revitalizes your lovely locks, and adds luster to your nails.

And the best part? It’s completely natural. Why coat your body in noxious, chemical-laden creams and lotions when you can utilize something that is so good for your skin, you can eat it. How many lotions do you have that can boast that?

So, what are these magical abilities that raw honey can bestow upon you? Well, here are a few to get you started:

  1. Say goodbye to scars

Honey possesses the very convenient ability to hydrate your skin, promoting the restoration of skin cells and encouraging younger, suppler skin. This same ability means that honey can help to fade or potentially remove scars if applied repeatedly over time. Honey may even help to prevent scars from forming in the first place. Try rubbing the following concoction on small wounds or areas that have the potential to develop scar tissue. The anti-inflammatory and antibacterial agents in honey will also ensure that your booboo heals quickly and doesn’t develop an infection.

What to do: Combine a teaspoon of raw honey with a teaspoon of either olive oil or coconut oil (I usually use coconut oil as it’s less likely to stain your clothes and makes you smell delicious). Once you’ve blended the ingredients (warming the coconut oil and honey to room temperature first should help with that), gently massage the salve into the area of concern for at least a minute. Placing a cloth soaked in warm water will help to soak the mixture into your skin, amplifying its healing properties.

2.  Power wash those pores

The enzymes in raw honey that make it such an easily digestible sugar also help to cleanse your skin and purify the pores of your skin. In addition, for those people who suffer from acne problems, the antibacterial powers of both raw honey and coconut oil can help to minimize bacterial buildup in your pores and prevent yet another zit invasion. 

What to do: Mix together room temperature raw honey and coconut oil until it’s smooth and malleable. Apply the mixture to dry, clean skin and gently rub it in, in a circular motion, making sure to steer well clear of your eyes. Leave the mixture on for a few minutes, then rinse off with lukewarm water.

3.  Hydrate your hair 

Honey can also be utilized to get tired hair back on track. Its healing properties, when combined with coconut oil, help to smooth hair cuticles, repair breaks and split ends, and restore that shine to your hair — which all the mainstream shampoo brands promise but never deliver.

What to do: Mix together a tablespoon of room-temperature honey with two tablespoons of liquid coconut oil (coconut oil becomes liquid at around room temperature). Rub the mixture on your hands then apply it generously to your hair, starting from the bottom and working your way up towards the crown. Rinse off with warm water after leaving it in for around half an hour.

4.  Moisturize those cuticles

This mixture utilizes and the skin-softening ability of apple cider vinegar to wash away your cuticle woes. In addition, raw honey encourages the skin to draw moisture into itself, while apple cider vinegar helps to restore a healthy skin pH, which are all good things for your cuticles.

 

Thank You.

 

Ginger & Charles
 

Have A question about Honey?

Send it to us and we will talk about it here. Email Click

 

 


 

"What Does it Mean When You Get
Honey Comb in Box Visa in Liquid Honey"

 

To answer this question, we have researched many sources and have posted a couple of them below. Our summary will appear at the conclusion.

                                                                                
 
                                                                                                                                                 

 This photo shows two frames from a beehive. The frame on the right is a sheet of wax foundation (the bees have not started to add wax to this frame yet). The frame on the left is a sheet of the same type of wax foundation that has been built up by the bees. When you purhcase a square of honeycomb, this is how it all gets started. After the bees build a honeycomb structure onto the flat sheet of pure beeswax, the bees will begin filling each honeycomb with honey. When the bees cap the honeycomb, we harvest these frames and cut them into 4″ squares for packaging.

 


                bees making honycomb              

 

 

When making honey for extraction, a yellow plastic foundation is used. The plastic            foundation is more durable and can endure the extraction process in a centrifuge.            

                                                                                                                                                   

What I originally did was, I found aluminum pans that were about the length of a cookie sheet and I lined them with wax paper. I cut the comb out of the frame and laid it on the wax paper. Then laid another sheet of wax paper and put another layer of comb. I could fit about three layers, put the plastic lid on it and sealed it with masking tape around the edges. I was able to store a lot of comb that way and could pull a container out and grab some comb to fill a case of two of the honeycomb at a time. The layers didn't hurt the caps, so the comb was still looked nice when packaged. I didn't see any condensation inside the container when I opened it, but I recently talked to beekeepers who said the container should be air tight or condensation will get in. Whether I'm seeing it or not.

 

From these and additional sources we seem to believe that most beekeepers harvest the honeycomb and box it air tight for sale.  A smaller amount of people prefer the honeycomb in the liquid honey which seems less desirerable for presentation and so fourth.  Additionally it takes much more liquid honey
(by weight) for the bees to produce honeycomb - about 8 to 1.

 

Thank you.

More on another topic next week.

 

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"Raw:"

Another word when applied to Honey many

 people are left wondering.

 

Just about every health blog and recipe calls for the use of “raw” honey, but there’s quite a bit of confusion about what that means. 
Is it made differently from non-raw honey? Do things go into it or come out of it to make it raw? The labels don’t help because they usually just say “raw” but don’t explain why the honey deserves to be called that. There are essentially just two factors that determine the rawness of honey: temperature and texture.


How temperature determines raw honey

The technical definition of raw honey is very loose: it just means not heated past pasteurization. Great, now what does that mean? To understand that, it’s important to first understand what happens inside a beehive. When honeybees are at work, their collective body temperature rises and consequently warms their work area – that is, the honey. The temperature of an active hive, therefore, is about 95ºF (35ºC), and the honey is stable and “alive” – or rather, the enzymes in honey that give it the nutritional and beneficial qualities are alive. As long as the temperature of honey does not significantly rise past 95ºF/35ºC, the honey has not been pasteurized.

Many people misunderstand the concept of heating honey. There’s a myth that any heating whatsoever is harmful. But even the bees heat honey. During the dead of winter, honey can freeze inside the hive, and as clusters of bees move about their stock of food, they will reheat as necessary to feed off their comb. During the summer, the bees do not need to heat the honey, but the temperature is still about that 95ºF as long as they are working near the honey. The issue is that they heat the honey very gradually.

The irony is, people will insist the beekeeper not heat honey, but they’ll take it home and microwave it. This is called flash-heating, and this sudden (radioactive) heat destroys the enzymes and chemically changes the honey. It’s still sweet, but it’s now chemically more like a processed sweetener. In some cases, the taste may even be different. Even without any noticeable changes, the honey has lost all its nutritional value (and is no longer raw).

 


 

 

Local:
the most confusing word in the honey business – what does Local mean?
 

No question, the most miss understood word regarding Raw Honey is Local.  Just what is Local?  Every day someone is telling us that local is within one mile of their home or down the street and so forth.  This is not their fault.  I have been researching the word Local as it applies to Honey and I have discovered that Honey sellers and beekeepers alike have no unified answer.  Most people are considering that their honey be local when they are using it for allergy relief.  It stands to reason that if you take honey to develop your ammine system and get over your allergies.  You want the honey which contains the most allergens to which you are allergic.  Therefore, you want the broadest geographic area in which the foliage is the identical.  Here is a thought, if you utilize honey within one mile of your home, and a bee travel approximately two miles from the hive when searching for nectar, then your ammine system will be developed for that two-mile area.  However, let us say that the foliage is identical for a hundred-mile radius of your home and let’s also say, that the bee keeper has hundreds of hives in that area and again assuming that bees travel two miles from each of their hives a wider area and therefore the honey is more likely to contain a larger array of allergens far more balanced than the five hives down the street whose bees may focus on a narrow collection of nectar.  Keep in mind that bees don’t just go randomly about gathering nectar, they communicate with one another as to the best locations where the most nectar is available. It is possible go to few plants and therefore limiting the selection of the allergens contained in their honey. When too few hives are employed in to small of an area.

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